Invisible Fences: Prose Poetry as a Genre in French and American Literature

By Steven Monte | Go to book overview
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Acknowledgments

A genre of sorts, acknowledgments give an author the opportunity to make visible the many contributors to the published work. I am grateful to John Shoptaw and Matt Greenfield for reading and commenting on individual chapters of my writing; to Lanny Hammer, David Quint, and Tyrus Miller, who read and commented on an earlier version of the entire work; and to my readers and the staff at the University of Nebraska Press, who helped me mold the book into its final shape. I am also grateful to John Hollander for his continual support for this project. He helped me frame the issues and directed me to source material in ways that cannot be expressed in notes, and he challenged and encouraged me throughout my research and writing. Special thanks go to Leah Price for the care with which she read the entire manuscript in its irregular installments and offered suggestions. Special thanks also go to Dave Southward for reading everything in one large installment and prodding me to make my arguments and writing clear without loss of nuance. Finally, I would like to thank the Camargo Foundation, at whose center in Cassis I was a fellow in 1995. The foundation allowed me that rare combination of productivity and relaxation, for which I owe the directors and the other fellows as much if not more than the surroundings.

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