Pirates of Venus

By Edgar Rice Burroughs; F. Paul Wilson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOUR

To the House of the King

When I awoke, it was quite light in the room, and through a window I saw the foliage of trees, lavender and heliotrope and violet in the light of a new day. I arose and went to the window. I saw no sign of sunlight, yet a brightness equivalent to sunlight pervaded everything. The air was warm and sultry. Below me I could see sections of various causeways extending from tree to tree. On some of these I caught glimpses of people. All the men were naked, except for loincloths, nor did I wonder at their scant apparel, in the light of my experience of the temperatures on Venus. There were both men and women; and all the men were armed with swords and daggers, while the women carried daggers only. All those whom I saw seemed to be of the same age; there were neither children nor old people among them. All appeared comely.

From my barred window I sought a glimpse of the ground, but as far down as I could see there was only the amazing foliage of the trees, lavender, heliotrope, and violet. And what trees! From my window I could see several enormous boles fully two hundred feet in diameter. I had thought the tree I descended a giant, but compared with these, it was only a sapling.

As I stood contemplating the scene before me, there was a noise at the door behind me. Turning, I saw one of my captors entering the room. He greeted me with a few words, which I could not understand,

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Pirates of Venus
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Pirates of Venus *
  • Contents *
  • Introduction *
  • Chapter One - Carson Napier *
  • Chapter Two - Off for Mars *
  • Chapter Three - Rushing Toward Venus *
  • Chapter Four - To the House of the King *
  • Chapter Five - The Girl in the Garden *
  • Chapter Six - Gathering Tarel *
  • Chapter Seven - By Kamlot's Grave *
  • Chapter Eight - On Board the Sofal *
  • Chapter Nine - Soldiers of Liberty *
  • Chapter Ten - Mutiny *
  • Chapter Eleven - Duare *
  • Chapter Twelve - “a Ship!” *
  • Chapter Thirteen - Catastrophe *
  • Chapter Fourteen - Storm *
  • In Defense of Carson Napier *
  • Glossary *
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