Pirates of Venus

By Edgar Rice Burroughs; F. Paul Wilson | Go to book overview

SCOTT TRACY GRIFFIN


Glossary

CAST OF CHARACTERS

Alzo—Olthar's mate.

Anoos—Traitorous spy charged by the captain of the Sofal with infiltrating the Soldiers of Liberty. As a result, Anoos is strangled by Zog.

Burroughs, Edgar Rice—Popular Tarzana-residing author contacted by Carson Napier, who seeks a publisher for his narrative of the adven- tures he encountered on Venus.

Byea—Vepajan woman liberated from the Thorists by Carson's privateers.

Carson, Judge John—A renowned and wealthy Virginian, the judge was Carson's maternal great-grandfather, with whom Carson lived for three years during his childhood. Upon adulthood, Carson used his inheritance from the judge to finance his interplanetary expedi- tion.

Chand Kabi—Carson's Hindu tutor, who also taught the young boy telepa- thy and mentalism.

Danus—Vepaja's chief physician and surgeon and head of the college of medicine and surgery, he was Carson's tutor and mentor in the court of Mintep, for whom Danus was the personal physician and curator of the royal library.

Duare—Eighteen-year-old virgin daughter of Mintep, Jong of Vepaja. As Mintep's only heir, she represents the hopes of the entire nation; Carson falls in love with her at first sight.

Duran—Patriarch of the House of Zar, his family rescues Carson from a tongzan and later takes him in as a ward.

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Pirates of Venus
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Pirates of Venus *
  • Contents *
  • Introduction *
  • Chapter One - Carson Napier *
  • Chapter Two - Off for Mars *
  • Chapter Three - Rushing Toward Venus *
  • Chapter Four - To the House of the King *
  • Chapter Five - The Girl in the Garden *
  • Chapter Six - Gathering Tarel *
  • Chapter Seven - By Kamlot's Grave *
  • Chapter Eight - On Board the Sofal *
  • Chapter Nine - Soldiers of Liberty *
  • Chapter Ten - Mutiny *
  • Chapter Eleven - Duare *
  • Chapter Twelve - “a Ship!” *
  • Chapter Thirteen - Catastrophe *
  • Chapter Fourteen - Storm *
  • In Defense of Carson Napier *
  • Glossary *
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