The Labor Market Experience of Workers with Disabilities: The ADA and Beyond

By Julie L. Hotchkiss | Go to book overview

Appendix B

SIPP Sample Construction

In the terminology of the Survey of Income and Program Participation, a Panel refers to a group of interviewees and the year in which that group was first interviewed. A Wave refers to an interview within a Panel. Each Panel has anywhere from 3 (1989 Panel) to 12 (1996 Panel) interviews. Further details of the SIPP can be found on the Internet at . Core data from each Wave within a Panel used for sample construction were merged with the topical module for Wave 2 from the same Panel. Wave 2 topical modules were used for identification of a work disability for consistency over as many consecutive years as possible. When available, core data from Wave 2 in one Panel were combined with core data from Wave 5 in the previous Panel and with core data from Wave 8 in the Panel before that in order to construct a larger sample year. Table B.1 presents the layout of the SIPP sampling structure. The Waves merged across Panels (columns in Table B.1) are combined for illustration using a bold box outline. Since the goal was to create multiple cross sections comparable to the CPS, only Waves 2, 5, and 8 in each Panel were exploited.

Combining data across Panels was not possible for sample years 1986, 1989, 1990, 1995, 1996, and 1997 due to the lack of availability of overlapping Panels for which disability information is available. The labor market information, due to the rotation of sets of questions in the SIPP, corresponds to June of the year referenced. The exception to this pattern is the 1997 sample labor market information, which came from Wave 5 of the 1996 panel, which corresponds to August of 1997. Of course, these waves were merged with the disability topical module for that panel.

The disability check in the topical module was the variable used to designate a work-limiting disability. There are two checks in topical modules for the 1986 —1993 Panels, but only one check in the 1996 Panel, resulting in the slightly smaller incidence of individuals with work-limiting disabilities in the 1996 and 1997 samples. The match rate across Waves within a Panel ranged from 81 to 89 percent success. Labor status refers to activity during the previous month (as opposed to the previous week, as in the CPS), since job information corresponds to activity over the month.

The primary usefulness of the SIPP derives from an ability to identify the nature of a disabled worker's disability. The categories identified are too numerous for all of them to be included in the analysis, so they are grouped into broad headings based on the classifications used by the Social Security Administration. Table B.2 shows how specific disabilities are classified.

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The Labor Market Experience of Workers with Disabilities: The ADA and Beyond
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Labor Market Experience of Workers with Disabilities - The Ada and Beyond *
  • Contents v
  • Figures vi
  • Tables viii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Preface xiii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Employment (Co-Authored with Ludmila Rovba) 21
  • 3 - Compensation: Wages and Benefits 49
  • 4 - Hours of Work, Distribution, and Representation 75
  • 5 - Separation, Unemployment, and Job Search 105
  • 6 - State Versus Federal Legislation 125
  • 7 - Conclusions and Policy Implications 141
  • Appendix A - Cps Sample Construction 157
  • Appendix B - Sipp Sample Construction 159
  • Appendix C - Supplemental Tables *
  • Appendix D - State Disability Legislation *
  • References 209
  • The Author 217
  • Index 219
  • About the Institute 229
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