The Barbed-Wire College: Reeducating German POWs in the United States during World War II

By Ron Robin | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION
1
John Morton Blum, V Was For Victory: Politics and American Culture during World War II (San Diego, 1976), 190–91.
2
Jeanne Hill, “Our Unlikely Thanksgiving, Reader's Digest (November 1992), 96–99.
3
Barry M. Katz, Foreign Intelligence: Research and Analysis in the Office of Strategic Services, 1942–1945 (Cambridge, Mass., 1989), xi.
4
The conscripted academics of the Division of Research and Analysis in the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), many of whom were on the cutting edge of their profession, provide a stark contrast to the state of affairs among reeducation officials. See Barry M. Katz, Foreign Intelligence, and Robin Winks, Cloak and Gown: Scholars in the Secret War, 1939–1961 (New York, 1987). See also Allan M. Winkler, The Politics of Propaganda: The Office of War Information, 1942– 1945 (New Haven, 1978), for an interesting study of another war project dominated by academics.
5
New York Times, February 13, 1945, 7.
6
Headquarters Army Service Forces, Handbook for Work Supervisors of Prisoner of War Labor (Washington, D.C., 1945), 4, Library of Congress Microfilms, L.C. 51437, Reel 2; Major General Archer L. Lerch, “The Army Reports on Prisoners of War, American Mercury 60 (May 1945), 536–47.
7
The War Department's final tabulation of POWs incarcerated in the continental United States appears in the New York Times, August 8, 1947, 19.
8
Arnold Krammer, “Japanese Prisoners of War in America, Pacific Historical Review 52 (February 1983), 67–91. Predictably, a half-hearted attempt to devise a reeducation program for these prisoners sputtered to a halt at a very early stage. See Richard Paul Walker, “Prisoners of War in Texas during World War II” (Ph.D. diss., North Texas State University, 1980), 328–44.
9
Louis E. Keefer, Italian Prisoners of War in America, 1942–1946: Captives or Allies? (New York, 1992), 56.
10
Ibid., 142.
11
George Gallup, The Gallup Poll: Public Opinion, 1935–1971, vol. 1 (New York, 1972), 370. See also Richard W Steele, “American Popular Opinion and the War Against Germany: The Issue of Negotiated Peace, 1942, Journal of American History 65 (December 1978), 704–23.
12
The Gallup Poll, 337.
13
Handbook for Work Supervisors of Prisoner of War Labor, 1.
14
Henry W. Ehrmann, “An Experiment in Political Education; The Prisoner-of-War Schools in the United States, Social Research 14 (September 1947), 319.

-189-

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