Constitutional Environmental Rights

By Tim Hayward | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Work on this book was initially stimulated through conversations with several friends and colleagues. For their encouragement, and for their guidance on legal aspects of the inquiry, thanks go to Michael Anderson, Alan Boyle, Christine Boch, Chris Himsworth, Antonia Layard, and Leonor Moral Soriano. Drafts of the work in progress benefited from discussions at various seminars, conferences, and workshops, and I would like to thank everyone who has contributed to its development at these events and in personal conversation, in particular Brian Barry, John Barry, Avner De-Shalit, Andrew Dobson, Andrew Light, David Miller, John O'Neill, Graham Smith, and Susan Stephenson.

A substantial portion of the initial research was made possible by ESRC grant R000222269 and this is gratefully acknowledged. Part of the research was conducted during a visiting fellowship at the Oxford Centre for Ethics, Environment and Society (OCEES), Hilary Term 1998, for which I warmly thank my hosts at Mansfield College. The rest of the work was carried out at the University of Edinburgh where I have enjoyed the support of excellent colleagues and the additional freedom to write afforded by a couple of terms' sabbatical leave. The University also supported the 1998 public seminar 'Constitutional Environmental Rights for Scotland?', whose assembled panel of lawyers, campaigners, and politicians helped simultaneously to broaden and to focus the perspectives that have come to inform this work, and I would particularly like to thank, in addition to people named elsewhere, Sarah Boyack and Andy Myles. I am also indebted to Eurig Scandrett and Friends of the Earth Scotland for the insights yielded by several seminars they have sponsored on environmental justice.

Special thanks go to my colleagues Russell Keat and Lynn Dobson for reading all of the chapters at critical stages in their

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Constitutional Environmental Rights
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 236

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.