The Sermons of Charles Wesley: A Critical Edition, with Introduction and Notes

By Charles Wesley; Kenneth G. C. Newport | Go to book overview

Sermon 6 Romans 3: 23-4

Introductory Comment

Charles's sermon on Romans 3: 23-4 carries three notes regarding the date and location of its delivery. These are 21 January 1739 at Islington, 25 February 1739 at Bexley, and 11 March 1739 at St Catherine's. All three dates can be confirmed from the journal and all are according to the 'new style'. The response to the sermon on these occasions appears to have been mixed. At Bexley some twenty of the congregation left the church. 1 In all three places Charles refers to this sermon as being on 'justification' (or 'justification by faith' in the case of Islington and Bexley). In this context it is worth noting that he records in his journal that he discoursed on this topic on several other occasions during that year, though it is not clear whether he made use of this sermon text. 2 (The 'sermon on justification' which Charles preached before the University (of Oxford) on 1 July 1739 is Sermon 7, the longer sermon on Romans 3: 23-5.) No dispute surrounds the authenticity of this sermon. There is nothing on the MS suggesting anything other than its composition by Charles.

The MS is held in the MARC. 3 It comprises eighteen leaves formed from nine folded sheets which have been stitch-bound into a booklet. Leaves 2-15 are written recto only and leaves 16-17 are entirely blank. Leaf 1, which, together with leaf 18, forms the front and back cover, is written verso only and contains a sermon register (three entries) and a section of shorthand at the bottom which is upside-down (see text for details). The final leaf is also written verso only; here we find a few notes, unrelated it seems to the sermon, on the formation of shorthand signs. 4 The handwriting appears to be that of Charles.

The sermon was first published in 1987 by Albin and Beckerlegge in their edition of the shorthand sermons and that transcription has proven invaluable in the preparation of this edition. However, on a number of points the text as printed here differs from that in Albin and Beckerlegge and the more significant of those differences have been indicated in the notes. Similarly, though in many places the reading given by Albin and Beckerlegge seems to be the most likely, there are occasions when it is perhaps less certain than they indicate. Again, such instances are indicated in the notes and a literal, unexpanded transcription of the shorthand is provided for the reader's further consideration.

This is one sermon where Charles draws fairly extensively on sources other than the Bible. The most important and obvious of these are the Articles of the Faith and the Homilies, particularly the homilies 'Of The Misery of Man' and 'Of the Salvation of all

-167-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Sermons of Charles Wesley: A Critical Edition, with Introduction and Notes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Sermons of Charles Wesley iii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Part I Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 Charles Wesley and Early Methodism 3
  • Chapter 2 Charles Wesley, Preacher 28
  • Chapter 3 Theological Characteristics and Use of Sources 48
  • Chapter 4 Charles Wesley's Sermon Corpus 71
  • Part II the Sermons 91
  • Sermon 1 Philippians 3: 13-14 93
  • Sermon 2 1 Kings 18: 21 107
  • Sermon 3 Psalm 126: 7 123
  • Sermon 4 1 John 3: 14 130
  • Sermon 5 Titus 3: 8 152
  • Sermon 6 Romans 3: 23-4 167
  • Sermon 7 Romans 3: 23-5 183
  • Sermon 8 Ephesians 5: 14 211
  • Sermon 9 Psalm 46: 8 225
  • Sermon 10 John 8: 1-11 238
  • Sermon 11 John 4: 41 259
  • Sermon 12 Luke 18: 9-14 268
  • Sermon 13 Acts 20: 7 277
  • Sermon 14 Luke 16: 10 287
  • Sermon 15 Matthew 5: 20 298
  • Sermon 16 Matthew 6: 22-3 306
  • Sermon 17 Luke 16: 8 314
  • Sermon 18 John 13: 7 325
  • Sermon 19 Exodus 20: 8 335
  • Sermon 20 Mark 12: 30 346
  • Sermon 21 Luke 10: 42 360
  • Sermon 22 Proverbs 11: 30 369
  • Sermon 23 Psalm 91: 11 380
  • Bibliography 391
  • Scriptural Index 397
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 407

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.