The Sermons of Charles Wesley: A Critical Edition, with Introduction and Notes

By Charles Wesley; Kenneth G. C. Newport | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Sermon 9 Psalm 46: 8

Introductory Comment

This sermon was written in response to the several earthquakes that hit London in February and March 1750. The most significant appears to have been that on 8 March. 1 There is no entry in Charles's journal for this day, but the entry for 10 March records how he preached on Isaiah 24 'a chapter I had not taken much notice of, till this awful providence explained it'. Quite what the content of that sermon was is unknown, but a reading of the chapter clearly suggests what Charles might have said given the 'awful providence' he had just experienced. 2 By 4 April, 1750 he had constructed a written text of a sermon on the subject of earthquakes. His journal entry for that day reads

Fear filled our chapel, occasioned by a prophecy of the earthquake's return this night. I preached my written sermon on the subject, with great effect, and gave out several suitable hymns. It was a glorious night for the disciples of Jesus. 3

It must be a very real probability that the 'written sermon' here referred to is the Cause and Cure of Earthquakes published the same year. Charles's specific reference to his 'written' sermon may suggest that by this date he was no longer in the regular habit of committing his sermons to paper. This is conjecture, but in the light of the evidence presented in Chapter 2 , not at all unreasonable. In any case, this sermon is the latest for which any literary evidence has survived. The 'suitable hymns' referred to in the journal entry may have been taken from those which he composed specifically to mark these startling events, later published by him under the title Hymns Occasioned by the Earthquake March 8, 1750. 4

There is no dispute concerning the authenticity of this sermon, though it was printed in the major 1872 edition of the works of John Wesley without any qualifying note. 5 This has led to some confusion. However, the second edition (1756) clearly gives the name of Charles Wesley as the author. No MS has survived. The text reproduced below is that which has been reconstructed from the first edition, a copy of which is held in the John Rylands University Library of Manchester. 6

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Sermons of Charles Wesley: A Critical Edition, with Introduction and Notes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 407

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.