The Sermons of Charles Wesley: A Critical Edition, with Introduction and Notes

By Charles Wesley; Kenneth G. C. Newport | Go to book overview

Sermon 12 Luke 18: 9-14

Introductory Comment

This sermon exists in two drafts, one complete, the other not. Both are held at the John Rylands University Library of Manchester. 1 The incomplete MS is quite clearly only a portion of what we may presume to have been a completed whole; it ends at the bottom of page 4, the following pages being now lost. The longer, complete, MS is here referred to as 'MS B' and the shorter, incomplete, as 'MS A'.

There is no indication on either MS as to where or when the sermon was preached. However, the journal seems to be helpful on this point. The first explicit reference to Charles's preaching on this text is on Sunday, 14 August 1743, when he preached from it in West Street Chapel, London. 2 Almost five years later (28, April 1748) he 'discoursed on the Pharisee and publican' and 'the divine power and blessing made the word effectual'. 3 We cannot of course be certain that he used this sermon on either occasion, but it must be a distinct possibility. At the very least it may be presumed that there was some considerable overlap.

It is not clear which of these two drafts is the earlier. Albin and Beckerlegge think that it is MS A, and in this they are probably right. For example, we may note that the shorthand script in MS B seems more abbreviated than its counterpart in MS A. This suggests, perhaps, that as Charles became more acquainted with the text of the sermon he was able to rely less on the script before him and more upon his memory for the words he was to preach. Thus while in MS A he felt it wise to write 'fr ts t gift f gd n jc' for 'for it is the gift of God in Jesus Christ', in MS B he could rely on the letters 'fr tsgg n cj' to provide him with the framework of the same basic phrase. 4 Such examples could easily be multiplied. 5 The form of the text presented here corresponds directly to MS B, the complete MS. Differences between this and MS A are noted in the footnotes.

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The Sermons of Charles Wesley: A Critical Edition, with Introduction and Notes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Sermons of Charles Wesley iii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Part I Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 Charles Wesley and Early Methodism 3
  • Chapter 2 Charles Wesley, Preacher 28
  • Chapter 3 Theological Characteristics and Use of Sources 48
  • Chapter 4 Charles Wesley's Sermon Corpus 71
  • Part II the Sermons 91
  • Sermon 1 Philippians 3: 13-14 93
  • Sermon 2 1 Kings 18: 21 107
  • Sermon 3 Psalm 126: 7 123
  • Sermon 4 1 John 3: 14 130
  • Sermon 5 Titus 3: 8 152
  • Sermon 6 Romans 3: 23-4 167
  • Sermon 7 Romans 3: 23-5 183
  • Sermon 8 Ephesians 5: 14 211
  • Sermon 9 Psalm 46: 8 225
  • Sermon 10 John 8: 1-11 238
  • Sermon 11 John 4: 41 259
  • Sermon 12 Luke 18: 9-14 268
  • Sermon 13 Acts 20: 7 277
  • Sermon 14 Luke 16: 10 287
  • Sermon 15 Matthew 5: 20 298
  • Sermon 16 Matthew 6: 22-3 306
  • Sermon 17 Luke 16: 8 314
  • Sermon 18 John 13: 7 325
  • Sermon 19 Exodus 20: 8 335
  • Sermon 20 Mark 12: 30 346
  • Sermon 21 Luke 10: 42 360
  • Sermon 22 Proverbs 11: 30 369
  • Sermon 23 Psalm 91: 11 380
  • Bibliography 391
  • Scriptural Index 397
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