Emin Pasha and the Rebellion at the Equator: A Story of Nine Months' Experience in the Last of the Soudan Provinces

By A. J. Mounteney Jophson; Henry M. Stanley | Go to book overview

PREFACE.

SINCE my return from Africa I have been asked by many people to write about my experiences with Emin Pasha in the Equatorial Province, which extended over a period of time from April 22nd, 1888, when I first reached M'swa, to January 31st, 1889, when I left Emin's province to rejoin my leader, Mr. Stanley.

My friends have urged that I alone can fill in this gap in the story of the expedition, and I have there- fore consented to write.

Enough is now known of Emin Pasha for people to readily understand that he was not the man all Europe supposed him to be; or "a second Gordon," as some of his admirers termed him.

Proud of his Province, and trusting in the loyalty of his people, he asked Mr. Stanley to leave one of his officers to help him in preparing his people to start for the coast if they wished to do so, and to make a report upon the Province.

Mr. Stanley nominated me, and left me with Emin on his return to Yambuya, to bring up the rear column.

I had not been in the Province long, before I began to see things which surprised me greatly, and which I could not but deplore. Discipline, as I understood discipline, was not enforced, for Emin's orders were openly discussed and questioned by his- people.

-xi-

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