Emin Pasha and the Rebellion at the Equator: A Story of Nine Months' Experience in the Last of the Soudan Provinces

By A. J. Mounteney Jophson; Henry M. Stanley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV. TROUBLE IMPENDING.

We start for Rejaf -- A herd of elephants -- Country near Dufilé cataracts -- Chor Ayu -- Laboré station -- Selim Aga -- Donkeys of the country -- Bari women -- Arrival at Muggi -- Abdullah Aga Manzal -- Thievish propensities of Emin's soldiers -- Arrival at Kirri -- Bachit Aga -- Gordon's favourite amusement -- Bari ornaments and dress -- State of the country occupied by 1st Battalion -- The soldiers of Kirri distrust us -- Speaking to the people of Kirri -- Makraka music and dance -- Letter from Hamad Aga -- Confirmation of my worst fears -- Insubordination of the soldiers of Kirri -- Our return to Muggi -- Alarming news from Kirri -- Emin's sad story -- Soldiers of Rejaf come to see Emin -- Emin's confidence in his soldiers -- News from Hawashi Effendi -- Story of Taha Mahomet -- Strangers in Latooka -- Bari chief's generosity -- My servant Binza prays -- Possible return of the Mahdists -- Evacuation of Muggi begun -- Satisfactory condition of country round Muggi -- Good influence of Abdullah Aga Manzal.

I ROSE on the morning of July 17th, dejected and depressed, and while we drank our coffee before starting on the march, I ventured to tell Emin of my conversation with Hawashi Effendi the evening before. He affected to make light of it, but told me he had decided not to go straight down to Rejaf, but to remain at Kirri, a station two days' march this side of Rejaf, and send on Hamad Aga and the other officers to tell the officers of the 1st Battalion of their meeting with us. After doing this, Hamad Aga was

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Emin Pasha and the Rebellion at the Equator: A Story of Nine Months' Experience in the Last of the Soudan Provinces
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 490

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.