Emin Pasha and the Rebellion at the Equator: A Story of Nine Months' Experience in the Last of the Soudan Provinces

By A. J. Mounteney Jophson; Henry M. Stanley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI. BEGINNING OF THE REBELLION.

Arrival at Laboré -- Reading of the Letters -- Mutiny of the Soldiers -Speaking to the Mutineers -- Soldiers' distrust of their Mudir -- Demeanour of Emin's followers -- The Mutineers send for mere -- Departure for Chor Ayu -- The Mahdists at Boa -- Khedive's letter sent to Rejaf -- Emin's opinion of the Khedive's letter -- Desertion of Emin's orderly -- Letter announcing rebellion of 2nd Battalion -- Emin's distress at the news -- Short-sightedness of Emin's people -- Our departure for Dufilé -- Rain and Sunshine -- Dreary appearance of country -- We prepare to enter Dufilé.

WE arrived at Laboré on August 12th; it was our intention to stop there for two days, and then to hurry on south to Wadelai, there to again try to get a party started for Fort Bodo. Selim Aga, on our arrival, said that he had spoken to all the soldiers there, and they had declared themselves ready to begin the evacuation of the station. He had sent out a party of Latooka natives with five soldiers, to obtain news of the strangers; but they had not yet returned.

On the day after our arrival I went up to the station with Emin to speak to the people before leaving for the south.

I read the Khedive's and Stanley's letters, and explained as usual everything connected with the Expedition. Whilst I was speaking I noticed that the soldiers were not as attentive as was generally

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