The Global Covenant: Human Conduct in a World of States

By Robert Jackson | Go to book overview

1 The Normative Dialogue of International Society

This introductory chapter opens with two conversations, one imaginary and one historical, which illustrate that value questions are at centre stage in world politics. It then recapitulates the political conversation of humankind by focusing on the discourses of diplomacy and international law. It goes on to outline the basic norms of international society: procedural norms of international law which are part of a larger ethics of political principle, and prudential norms of statecraft which are part of a larger ethics of political virtue. The chapter ends by stating a central thesis of the book: namely that a normative dialogue of world politics is possible to the extent that it is divorced from the values of particular civilizations—such as that of the West or that of East Asia or that of the Muslim world.


Two Conversations of World Politics

Let us begin with a brief imaginary conversation between a senior career diplomat in the United States Department of State, and a respected public television journalist. The interview takes place several years after the end of the cold war. It concerns the US foreign policy response to a military intervention by Russia the previous day in a small Islamic state located in Central Asia which was formerly part of the Soviet Union but is now a member of the United Nations. That new state is the site of a bitter civil war that poses a threat to its Russian minority population.

Journalist: What is the latest news on the Russian intervention?
Diplomat: Our ambassador indicates that their army have occupied the capital. They are currently patrolling the city which is calm. Our own people are safe. The Islamic government have fled the city and they appear to be operating from a mountainous region in the south of the country. Their ambassador has called upon us for assistance. They have requested a meeting of the UN Security Council as soon as possible.
Journalist: What is our policy?
Diplomat: We are using our good offices to help bring the parties into a dialogue which hopefully will lay the basis for a peaceful settlement of their dispute.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Global Covenant: Human Conduct in a World of States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 464

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.