The Global Covenant: Human Conduct in a World of States

By Robert Jackson | Go to book overview

3 Recovering the Classical Approach

This chapter rejuvenates the classical international society approach by enlarging upon the argument that international relations is a human activity. It begins by reviewing three approaches to international relations scholarship: positivism, post-positivism, and humanism. It argues that only the third approach can correctly comprehend the human character of world politics. Pursuing that point in the remainder of the chapter, it calls attention to fourteen classical texts for studying international human conduct. It proceeds to interrogate two leading positivist theories of international relations with the aim of disclosing the shortcomings of excluding norms and values from the inquiry. It goes on to examine and reject a standard criticism of moral claims in political life: the so-called window-dressing critique. The final section prepares the way for a commentary on the craft discipline of humanist inquiry in the next chapter.


Retrieving the Human Sciences

The behavioural revolution of the 1950s and 1960s brought about almost a complete take-over of the discipline of political science, especially in the USA, by positivist attitudes and methods of research. 1 Traditional normative inquiry was abandoned to the care of the political theorists. With the missionary zeal of recent converts, the American behaviouralists recruited and educated a new generation of political scientists who had little knowledge of their classical predecessors and even less interest in knowing anything about them. All previous political science was obsolete and should not be taken too seriously. It was like Aristotle's biology: it belonged in a curiosity shop. That is more or less what the behaviouralists taught their students, and that is what their students who later came to dominate political science, especially in the USA, were evidently prepared to believe. That was emphasized by Kenneth Waltz in a guarded criticism of Martin Wight and Hedley Bull: 'they did theory in a sense not recognized as theory by philosophers of science'. 2 In other words, their theories were not 'scientific' theories in the positivist meaning of the term.

-44-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Global Covenant: Human Conduct in a World of States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 464

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.