Grace and Christology in the Early Church

By Donald Fairbairn | Go to book overview

7 Grace and the Logos' Double Birth in the Early Church

I began this study with the question of the relation between the various christologies of the early fifth-century Church, and I argued that one's evaluation of these depends to a great degree on one's assessment of what the central issue of the controversy was. If one were to consider the primary question to be whether a given christology maintains that there is in Christ one person but two realities or natures, then one could argue that the theological differences between the major parties involved in the Nestorian controversy were not significant. If one were to consider christology largely in formulaic terms and to ask whether a given writer began with duality or unity in Christ, then one could perhaps regard Cassian's thought as closer to that of Nestorius than to Cyril's. However, if one considers christology to be the expression of grace, as I have done in this study, one will recognize that there was a fundamental contrast between two concepts of what God gives to humanity in grace through Christ, of how redemption is achieved, and therefore of who Christ must be (and is) in order to accomplish this salvation. As I conclude this study, I will summarize briefly what I have claimed concerning these two patterns of grace and christology, and I will then suggest what I believe these findings imply concerning the christology of the early Church as a whole.


7.1 Grace and the Single Subject of Christ

I have attempted to show that for Theodore, Christ is a graced man, the one who is both the supreme example and the unique recipient of the Logos' co-operative assistance. As such he is the mediator of grace to us, the one who has received divine aid from

-200-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Grace and Christology in the Early Church
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 257

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.