A Dictionary of Literary Symbols

By Michael Ferber | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I must first thank my colleague Douglas Lanier for helping me think through this dictionary from the outset, for encouragement during early frustrations, and for a great deal of detailed advice. E. J. Kenney of Peterhouse, Cambridge, saved me from a number of mistakes in Latin and offered countless suggestions about not only classical but English literature; his notes would make a useful and delightful little book by themselves. David Norton made many helpful suggestions regarding biblical passages. Two graduate students at the University of New Hampshire gave valuable assistance, Heather Wood at an early phase by collecting data from books not close at hand and William Stroup by going over every entry with a keen eye to readability and cuts. My wife Susan Arnold also cheerfully read every entry and offered many helpful ideas.

I am grateful to Maria Pantelia for providing me with the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae on CD-ROM and advice on how to use it. Cynthia Pawlek of Baker Library, Dartmouth, initiated me into the English Poetry DataBase, also on disk. Robin Lent, Deborah Watson, and Peter Crosby of Dimond Library at UNH patiently handled my many requests and, during the reconstruction of the library, even set up a little room just large enough for the Loeb classical series and me. I also made good use of the library of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, and I thank Gordon Hunt for his good offices there.

The Humanities Center of UNH gave me a grant for a semester's leave and an office in which to store unwieldy concordances and work in peace; its director Burt Feintuch and administrator Joanne Sacco could not have been more hospitable.

For contributing ideas, quotations, references, and encouragement I also thank Ann and Warner Berthoff, Barbara Cooper, Michael DePorte, Patricia Emison, John Ernest, Elizabeth Hageman, Peter Holland, Edward Larkin, Ronald LeBlanc, Laurence Marschall, Susan Schibanoff, and Charles Simic. My editor at Cambridge University Press, Josie Dixon, not only solicited Professors Kenney and Norton to go over my entries but made many helpful suggestions herself while shepherding the book through its complex editing process. For the errors and weaknesses that remain despite all this expert help I am of course responsible.

I would be glad to hear from readers who have found particularly glaring omissions of symbols or meanings of a symbol, or any mistakes, against the possibility of a revised edition. I can be reached c/o English Department, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA.

-viii-

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A Dictionary of Literary Symbols
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • A Dictionary of Literary Symbols *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments viii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Introduction 1
  • A Dictionary of Literary Symbols 7
  • Authors Cited 249
  • Bibliography 259
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