Women Take Care: Gender, Race and the Culture of AIDS

By Katie Hogan | Go to book overview

NOTES

Preface
1.
As Pia Thielmann points out, the danger of “the symbol 'Mother / Woman' ” is that it “makes real flesh-and-blood women an abstraction, even if it's an elevating ab- straction” (64).
2.
Sarah Schulman similarly discusses the problematic visibility of lesbians in Jonathan Larson's Rent.
3.
See Odets.
4.
For work on women and AIDS from a global perspective, see Long and Ankrah; and Berer with Ray.

Chapter 1. Women and AIDS
1.
See Golden.
2.
See Valian, who uses the term “gender schema” to refer to historically en- trenched ideas about gender embedded in people and institutions. Gender schemas are “cognitive frameworks” (104).
3.
Carol Levine writes, ''I was labeled a 'selfish wife,' since I refused to take [my husband] home without home care” (1588).
4.
For a different view on heterosexual women, gay men, and AIDS in drama, see Fierstein. The main female character contracts HIV from her closeted ex-husband while her ex-husband's lover tests negative.

Another interesting departure is Jane Gillooly's documentary film on abortion, which is an unusual linking of women's health and sexuality to that of gay men. In Leona's Sister, Gerri (1995), Gillooly explores the true story of a young, white, working- class woman who died in a motel of an illegal abortion in 1964. Near the end of the film, Gillooly makes a visual connection to the sexuality and health of gay men in the AIDS epidemic when she focuses her lens on a white gay man dressed in a priest's robes as he marches in an AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP) demonstration. A large wooden cross rests on his left shoulder; in his right hand is a poster with an

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Women Take Care: Gender, Race and the Culture of AIDS
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Women Take Care - Gender, Race, and the Culture of Aids *
  • Contents *
  • Preface *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Chapter 1 - Women and Aids Paradox of Visibility *
  • Chapter 2 - Little Eva Revisited *
  • Chapter 3 - Absent Mothers and Missing Children *
  • Chapter 4 - The Lesbian Mammy *
  • Chapter 5 - What Looks like Progress Black Feminist Narratives on Hiv/Aids *
  • Conclusion - Beyond Sentimental Aids *
  • Notes *
  • Works Cited *
  • Index *
  • About the Author *
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