The London Chronicles of the Fifteenth Century: A Revolution in English Writing

By Mary-Rose McLaren | Go to book overview

Appendix 3: Technical Information about
London Chronicle Groups

The following provides the technical information underlying the organisation of the manuscripts in Chapter three.


ST. JOHN'S GROUP

Minor Variations

Most of the variations within this grouping of manuscripts are minor. They may be categorized as:

Changes or corrections which a chronicler might logically make as he works. An example occurs in 1351. Julius B. I begins with the words 'This yere', and opens the second item of the entry with 'And the same yere'. Both Guildhall 3313 and St. John's 57, however, begin with 'Also in this same yere', and they and Vitellius F. IX commence the second item with 'And in this yere'. It appears that Julius B. I or its immediate source has simplified the introductory form for this entry (as indeed Julius B. I appears to do on several occasions).

Changes which occur because of the chronicler's difficulty in reading the source passage. In this group such errors are relatively uncommon and occur only where the words are unfamiliar to the writer, particularly when place names or the names of people are involved.

In 1425, for example, St. John's 57, Julius B. I and Vitellius F. IX all agree on the names of knights listed and on their order, though not always on their spelling. The list appearing in Guildhall 3313, however, has several idiosyncrasies.

Other variations occur in names listed in the manuscripts in 1388, 1414, 1425 and 1429. Place names may also present some difficulties to the writer. For example, Westminster may appear as Winchester (Vitellius F. IX). It is sometimes difficult to determine whether there is a problem with writing, ambiguous abbreviations, or copying errors.

Adding to or deleting from a passage being copied. Julius B. I differs from the group in 1420 when discussing the marriage and coronation of Queen Katherine.

In 1429 the differences between Guildhall 3313/Vitellius F. IX and St. John's 57/Julius B. I in their accounts of the king's journey to Calais can be explained in the same way.

Variations occur in formal language when the writer enters a synonym for a word appearing in the other manuscripts and perhaps in his source.

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The London Chronicles of the Fifteenth Century: A Revolution in English Writing
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 294

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.