On Law, Politics, and Judicialization

By Martin Shapiro; Alec Stone Sweet | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

I am not by nature much of a collaborator. Alec has been the moving force behind this volume and has done a disproportionate share of the work in bringing it to fruition. Recently I have had occasion to reflect on how much of my scholarly life has been determined by the opportunities offered me by other people. I quickly came to a list of over 30, including Alec, but no one would be willing to read such a long list. I would, however, like to acknowledge those responsible for major redirections in my work. Sam Krislov, Antonin Scalia, and Lief Carter moved me into writing about administrative law, and the former Dean and the Assistant Dean of my law school, Sandy Kadish and Jan Vetter, into teaching in that area. Fred Greenstein drew me into writing on comparative law. I am deeply indebted to Mauro Cappelletti and Joseph Weiler for my initial forays in European Union matters and to Anne-Marie Slaughter, Joe, Renaud Dehousse, and Yves Meny for my subsequent re-entry. Alfred Aman recruited me into the globalization campaign and Harry Scheiber into its contract battalion.

The publishers who have allowed us to reproduce articles are acknowledged separately, in the text.

Martin Shapiro

February 2002

The research published in this book was supported in part by grants awarded by the US National Science Foundation, the US National Endowment for the Humanities, the Institute for Global Peace and Conflict Studies of the University of California-Irvine, the Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation of the University of California-San Diego, and the Center for German and European Studies of the University of California-Berkeley.

Many months of work went into preparing the diverse elements of this manuscript for publication. I thank Margaret McCown (my graduate student assistant at Nuffield College), Ms Lin Sorrell and Ms Emma Hunter (of the secretarial staff at Nuffield College), Hannah Driscoll and Michael James (Oxford University Press) and Barbara Shapiro for their help with scanning, formatting, and copy-editing texts, chasing down lost references, and many other important, but often mind-numbing, tasks.

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
On Law, Politics, and Judicialization
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • On Law, Politics, and Judicialization iii
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Figures x
  • 1: Law, Courts, and Social Science 1
  • Political Jurisprudence 19
  • Judicialization and the Construction of Governance 55
  • Appendix 88
  • 2: Judicial Law-Making and Precedent 90
  • Towards a Theory of Stare Decisis 102
  • Path Dependence, Precedent, and Judicial Power 112
  • 3: Constitutional Judicial Review 136
  • The Success of Judicial Review and Democracy 149
  • Constitutional Politics in France and Germany 184
  • 4: Testing, Comparison, Prediction 209
  • The Giving Reasons Requirement 228
  • Appendix 290
  • 5: Judges and Company 292
  • Globalization of Freedom of Contract 296
  • Islands of Transnational Governance 323
  • 6: Abstract Review and Judicial Law-Making 343
  • References 376
  • Index 407
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 417

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.