5 International Law

The first part of our project is now complete. We have developed a working explanatory model of defensive rights. Our task now is to attempt to apply this model to the purported right of national-defense. Our question shall be: to what extent can national-defense be seen as a valid instance of the broader class of defensive rights which we have charted in Part I , and in particular what is its relation to the right of self-defense? 1 Before we can do this, however, we need an understanding of the content of the supposed right of national self-defense which we will hope to scrutinize. What does it encompass? How is it conceived? What is the scope of its limitations and permissions? 2

In answering these questions, it is very important that we do not simply construct a straw-man to subsequently demolish. Any account of national self-defense, even an ultimately sceptical and destructive one such as I shall pursue, must explain why the notion has seemed so morally credible for so long and to so many people—including many great and distinguished thinkers. If we suspect a sickness in our thinking about war and peace, our procedure must be in part diagnostic as well as remedial.

The claim that there is a right of national-defense receives its principal articulation and defense in the western tradition within the Just War Theory. But the Just War Theory is, in reality, many theories. It is more accurate to talk of the 'just war tradition' rather than the 'Just War Theory', for it includes a large number of diverse yet related positions stretching from the theological writings of Augustine and Aquinas, via the legal treatises of Grotius and his contemporaries, to the modern secular account found in writers

-103-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
War and Self-Defense
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 214

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.