The Incarnation: An Interdisciplinary Symposium on the Incarnation of the Son of God

By Stephen T. Davis; Daniel Kendall et al. | Go to book overview

8 Nature and the 'Mode of Union': Late Patristic Models for the Personal Unity of Christ

Brian E. Daley, SJ

One of the older colleges of the University of Oxford—the one which still, more than six centuries after its foundation, characteristically goes by the name of 'New College'—bears on its coat of arms a medieval English proverb which apparently was the motto of its fourteenth-century founder, Bishop William of Wykeham: 'Maners Makyth Man'. The bishop was surely not trying to remind future generations of undergraduates of the importance of writing thank-you notes promptly and passing the port to the left; 'manners', in this somewhat archaic usage, clearly means something closer to 'virtue' or 'good character', something akin to the Latin word mores—in the words of the Oxford English Dictionary, 'a person's habitual behaviour or conduct, especially in reference to its moral aspect'. It may not be too much of an exaggeration to say that behind this phrase lies a whole anthropology, a whole metaphysics of what it is to be human: as free and intelligent beings, we are not simply the products of instinct or of the mechanical forces of our nature, not fully definable by dispassionate observation or philosophical analysis; we are formed, made human, made persons in the fullest sense by our choices and habits, and by the patterns in our relationships to others that define moral character.

We have gathered in this 'summit' conference to reflect on the significance, for the church and for human thought, of the Christian doctrine of the incarnation: the fundamental conviction of Christian faith that in Jesus of Nazareth God's eternal, personally substantial

-164-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Incarnation: An Interdisciplinary Symposium on the Incarnation of the Son of God
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 404

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.