Political Parties: Old Concepts and New Challenges

By Richard Gunther; Jose Ramon Montero et al. | Go to book overview
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Contributors

Stefano Bartolini (1952) is Professor of Comparative Political Institutions at the European University Institute, Florence. He was previously professor at the Universities of Florence, Trieste and Geneva, and visiting professor at the Instituto Juan March. His most recent publications include The Class Cleavage. The Electoral Mobilisation of the European Left 1880-1980 (2000); 'Collusion, Competition and Democracy', in Journal of Theoretical Politics (1999-2000); and 'Franchise Expansion', in Richard Rose (ed.), Encyclopedia of Elections (2000).

Jean Blondel (1929) was educated at the Institut d'Études Politiques in Paris and at St Antony's College, Oxford. He was the founding Professor of the Department of Government of the University of Essex and one of the co-founders and first Executive Director of the European Consortium for Political Research. He has been professor at the European University Institute in Florence, to which he remains associated, and is current visiting professor at the University of Siena. His field is Comparative Government and his recent publications include Governing Together (co-edited with Ferdinand Müller-Rommel, 1993), Comparative Government (last edn., 1995), Party and Government (1997), and The Nature of Party Government (2000) (both co-edited with Maurizio Cotta).

Hans Daalder (1928) was Professor of Political Science at Leiden University from 1963 to 1993, and visiting professor at the Instituto Juan March. One of the founding members of the European Consortium for Political Research, he was the first Head of Department of Political and Social Sciences at the European University Institute. One result of the latter was the book edited with Peter Mair, Western European Party Systems: Continuity and Change (1983). More recently he organized and edited a volume of intellectual (auto)biographies of comparative politics scholars entitled Comparative European Politics. The Story of a Profession (1997). He is working on a biography of the leading post-1945 Prime Minister of the Netherlands, Willem Drees (1886-1988).

Richard Gunther (1946) is Professor of Political Science at the Ohio State University. At Ohio State, he has also served as Director of the West European Studies Program and Executive Director of International Studies. He is founder and co-chair of the Subcommittee on Southern Europe of the

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