Democracy beyond Borders: Justice and Representation in Global Institutions

By Andrew Kuper | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

My most important intellectual debt is to Onora O'Neill, whose incisive comments and Menschlichkeit improved my thinking and well-being at every turn. Amartya Sen helped me to integrate key normative and empirical concerns. John Dunn, David Held, and Istvan Hont vigorously exposed my weaknesses, and then strengthened my grasp of the context and contentions of the text. Thomas Pogge lent me his ear and his air-conditioned office, both of which proved indispensable to surviving summers in New York. Raymond Geuss, John Tasioulas, and three anonymous reviewers offered inspiring challenges in the home stretch.

During my year at Harvard, made possible by the trustees of the Henry Fellowship, I profited greatly from regular discussions with Sandra Badin, Seyla Benhabib, Bryan Garsten, Michael Sandel, and Tim Scanlon. The rest of the research was funded entirely by Trinity College, Cambridge, where my fellow Fellows and my students provided an immensely stimulating home and work environment.

Some lifelong friends provided not only emotional but also intellectual and logistical support. Thank you to Lucy Delap, Jackie Dugard, Michael Pitman, Jimmy Roth, Simon Stacey, and Nir Tsuk. For empathy and exhilaration, I also thank Jude Browne, Adam Freudenheim, Fredrik Galtung, the other Kupers, Karen Lewis-Enright, Fiona Melrose, Annie Moser, the Oppenheimers, Adina Oskowitz, Robin and Tricia Pearse, Thiru and Ashika Pillay, Ornit Shani, and Sigal Spigel. Finally, I owe unique debts to Nim Geva, for laughter in the dark, to Zeev Emmerich, for daily illumination, and to Gordon Kuper, for devotion beyond borders.

I have dedicated the book to my family, who have crossed continents, actual and emotional, to be with me in the ways that matter.

All these generous people shaped the book and its author. However, according to the universal principles of academic justice, the author alone is responsible for every deficiency.

An earlier version of Chapter 1 appeared as 'Rawlsian Global Justice: Beyond The Law of Peoples to a Cosmopolitan Law of Persons', in Political Theory, Vol. 28, No. 5 (2000), 640-74.

An earlier version of Chapter 2 appeared as 'Why Deliberation Cannot Tame Globalisation: The Impossibility of a Deliberative Democrat,' in Analyse & Kritik, Vol. 25, No. 2 (2003), 176-98.

-ix-

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Democracy beyond Borders: Justice and Representation in Global Institutions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • About the Author ii
  • Democracy Beyond Borders iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction: Walking the Tightrope 1
  • 1: Global Justice 7
  • 2: Why Deliberation Cannot Tame Globalisation 47
  • 3: Representation as Responsiveness 75
  • 4: Transforming Global Institutions 137
  • Conclusion: Responsive Democracy 191
  • Bibliography 205
  • Index 219
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