Democracy beyond Borders: Justice and Representation in Global Institutions

By Andrew Kuper | Go to book overview

1 Global Justice

Beyond The Law of Peoples to a Cosmopolitan Law of Persons

John Rawls' The Law of Peoples (LP) represents a culmination of his reflections on how we might reasonably and peacefully live together in a just world. 6 My aim in this chapter is to show that a theory of global justice can be developed that is more in keeping with the Kantian constructivist procedures Rawls once employed for domestic justice in Political Liberalism and A Theory of Justice. 7 This result is important because it helps establish that my alternative conception of global justice better realises some fundamental liberal values, even on Rawls' own terms.

Rawls has a strong hold on the imaginations of political theorists, but that is not the main reason I have adopted the approach of reading and responding to his work so closely. Rather, it seems to me that his later work at once exemplifies the orthodoxy of 'liberal statism' that dominates the field and, along with his earlier work, contains powerful conceptual resources for overcoming that inconsistent and pernicious orthodoxy.

My core argument is that Rawls has begged some of the central questions of global justice by adopting at the outset a 'thin statist' conception of the legitimate divisions between persons who share a world. Once this ungrounded assumption is removed, the nature and

-7-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Democracy beyond Borders: Justice and Representation in Global Institutions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • About the Author ii
  • Democracy Beyond Borders iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction: Walking the Tightrope 1
  • 1: Global Justice 7
  • 2: Why Deliberation Cannot Tame Globalisation 47
  • 3: Representation as Responsiveness 75
  • 4: Transforming Global Institutions 137
  • Conclusion: Responsive Democracy 191
  • Bibliography 205
  • Index 219
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 228

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.