Democracy beyond Borders: Justice and Representation in Global Institutions

By Andrew Kuper | Go to book overview

3 Representation as Responsiveness

In framing a government to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place oblige it to control itself.

Madison et al., Federalist, No. 51.


1 Representation by Whom or What?

Representation is a normatively laden and rhetorically resonant term, and for this reason is much used and abused. People have disagreed, sometimes violently, about whether and by whom they are represented; theorists as dissimilar as Burke and Mill, supreme courts as different as the Frankfurter and the Rehnquist courts (to name but one constitutional tradition), have contradicted and tied themselves into knots in the search for a core, univocal meaning. 163 Yet it is profoundly unlikely that a term used for a range of purposes and in varied contexts should have a single meaning. It is hard enough to specify a determinate, limited, and consistent set of meanings relevant to a definite purpose.

My aim in this chapter is to develop a plausible conception of political representation appropriate to a practicable theory of democracy for societies of great and even global scope. As such, several more particular purposes, contexts, and uses must first be considered. I defend and elaborate a new conception of what Hannah Pitkin calls 'substantive' representation, that is, 'acting in the best interests of the public, in

-75-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Democracy beyond Borders: Justice and Representation in Global Institutions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • About the Author ii
  • Democracy Beyond Borders iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction: Walking the Tightrope 1
  • 1: Global Justice 7
  • 2: Why Deliberation Cannot Tame Globalisation 47
  • 3: Representation as Responsiveness 75
  • 4: Transforming Global Institutions 137
  • Conclusion: Responsive Democracy 191
  • Bibliography 205
  • Index 219
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 228

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.