The Handbook of Art Therapy

By Caroline Case; Tessa Dalley | Go to book overview

Bibliography

ART THERAPY THEORY AND RELATED AREAS
Adamson, E. (1984) Art as Healing. London, Coventure.
Axline, V. (1969) Play Therapy. New York, Ballantine Books.
Axline, V (1973) Dibs in Search of Self. Gollancz.
Barnes, M. and Berke, J. (1973) Two Accounts of a Journey through Madness. Harmondsworth, Penguin.
Baynes, H.G. (1940) The Mythology of the Soul. Tindall and Cox.
Betensky, M. (1973) Self-discovery through Self-expression. Springfield, Thomas.
Bowyer, R. (1970) The Lowenfeld Play Technique. Oxford, Pergamon Press.
Cardinal, R. (1972) Outside Art. Studio Vista.
Case, C. and Dalley, T. (eds) (1990) Working with Children in Art Therapy. London, Tavistock/Routledge.
Chetwynd, T. (1982) A Dictionary of Symbols. London, Paladin.
Circlot, J.E. (1971) A Dictionary of Symbols. London, Routledge and Kegan Paul.
Dalley, T. (ed.) (1984) Art as Therapy. An introduction to the use of art as a therapeutic technique. London, Tavistock.
Dalley, T. (1993) 'Art Psychotherapy Groups for Children', in Dwivedi, K. (ed.) Groupwork for Children and Adolescents. London, Jessica Kingsley.
Dalley, T. et al (1987) Images of Art Therapy. London, Tavistock.
Dalley, T., Rifkind, G. and Terry, K. (1993) Three Voices of Art Therapy: Image, Client, Therapist. London, Routledge.
Ehrenzweig, A. (1967) The Hidden Order of Art. London, Paladin.
Fuller, P. (1980) Art and Psychoanalysis. London, Writers and Readers.
Fuller, P. (1983) Aesthetics after Modernism. London, Writers and Readers.
Gardner, H. (1980) Artful Scribbles. Norman.
Gilroy, A. and Dalley, T. (eds) (1989) Pictures at an Exhibition. Selected Essays on Art and Art Therapy. London, Tavistock/Routledge.
Gilroy, A. and Lee, C. (eds) (1994) Art and Music: Therapy and Research. London, Routledge.
Gordon, R. (1978) Dying and Creating. Society of Analytical Psychology.
Hill, A. (1941) Art versus Illness. London, Allen and Unwin.
Kalff, D. (1980) Sand Play-a Psychotherapeutic Approach to the Psyche. Sigo Press.
Killick, K. and Schaverien, J. (eds) (1997) Art, Psychotherapy and Psychosis. London, Routledge.
Koestler, A. (1976) Act of Creation. Hutchinson.
Kramer, E. (1973) Art as Therapy with Children, London, Elek.
Kramer, E. (1979) Childhood and Art Therapy, New York, Schocken.

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The Handbook of Art Therapy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vi
  • Foreword viii
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Art Therapy Room 19
  • Chapter 3 - The Therapy in Art Therapy 50
  • Chapter 4 - Art and Psychoanalysis 71
  • Chapter 5 - The Image in Art Therapy 97
  • Chapter 6 - Development of Psychoanalytic Understanding 119
  • Chapter 7 - The Art Therapist 146
  • Chapter 8 - Art Therapy with Individual Clients 178
  • Chapter 9 - Working with Groups in Art Therapy 195
  • Bibliography 238
  • Glossary 242
  • British Association of Art Therapists 253
  • Name Index 258
  • Subject Index 261
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