The Japanese Main Bank System: Its Relevance for Developing and Transforming Economies

By Masahiko Aoki; Hugh Patrick | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

This study is the result of a World Bank sponsored project that has involved a large number of people, each of whom has contributed in a special way to this final product. Our deepest thanks go to Hyung-Ki Kim, Division Chief, Studies and Training Design Division, Economic Development Institute, World Bank, whose initiative and project management were essential throughout. We worked well together, and pleasurably so. We are also of course particularly indebted to our colleagues who wrote the chapters.

The scholars and practitioners who participated in this project met in an initial planning session and in two intensive workshop sessions to review chapter drafts in what was a labour-intensive but intellectually rewarding project. We, and they, benefited from the expertise, insight, and constructive comments made by the other participants in our meetings: Noritaka Akamatsu, World Bank; Jenny Corbett, Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies, University of Oxford; Monsoor Dailami, World Bank; Dennis deTray, World Bank; Ronald Gilson, Stanford University; Koichi Hamada, Economic Growth Center, Yale University; Christian Harm, New York University; Thomas Hellman, Stanford University; Akiyoshi Horiuchi, University of Tokyo; Kensuke Hotta, Managing Director, Sumitomo Bank; Millard Long, World Bank; Diane McNaughton, World Bank; Ronald McKinnon, Stanford University; Hideaki Miyajima, Waseda University; Junichi Nishiwaki, Mitsubishi Research Institute; Mitsuaki Okabe, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania; Ryuko Okazaki, Research and Statistics Division, Bank of Japan; Tetsuji Okazaki, University of Tokyo; Joseph Pegues, World Bank; Gerald Roland, Free University of Brussels; Tsutomu Shibata, Japan Development Bank; Xavier Simon, World Bank; Marilou Uy, World Bank; Dimitri Vittas, World Bank; Ernst-Ludwig von Thadden, University of Basel; and Ayako Yasuda, Stanford University.

Most of the funding for this project was provided by the World Bank. Additional funding was provided by the Center on Japanese Economy and Business and the Japan Relations Studies Program at Columbia University, and by the Economy of Japan Program of the Center for Economic Policy Research at Stanford University. We benefited from the project administration by staff at our two institutions, especially Kaori Kuroda and Shin Umezu at Columbia and Deborah Carvalho and Sharon Latimer at Stanford. Latifah Alsegaf at the World Bank ably and amiably assisted Hyung-Ki Kim and us throughout.

To turn a manuscript into a book requires a great deal of effort which all too often authors only inadequately appreciate. We are indebted to

-xv-

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