Texas in the Confederacy: An Experiment in Nation Building

By Clayton E. Jewett | Go to book overview
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In Chapter 3, the data for Indian attacks, horses stolen, lives lost, offensive measures, and Indians killed are based on an exhaustive search of the entire newspaper collection from 1861 through 1862 at the Barker Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin. All accounts appearing in newspapers were compared to ensure accuracy. There is no doubt, however, that many more attacks occurred during this period than are accounted for here.

The analysis of Chapter 4 is based on the complete muster-roll collection at the Texas State Library, Archives Division, Austin. Although the best effort was made to determine county residence for enlisted men, several difficulties did exist. Oftentimes, a muster roll listed only one county for all the men. It is quite possible, however, that in many cases some of the men listed did not reside in the said county, but instead hailed from a surrounding county. In some cases, a muster roll listed only the state of nativity. Other muster rolls listed only the camp where men enlisted. In these cases, even though the county location of the camp is known, the number of men were not included in the analysis because there was not a definite assurance of where these men came from. In still other instances, when the county where men resided is known, yet no date is given for their enlistment, these too were excluded from the analysis. There also existed a few instances where the city instead of the county was listed. In these cases, an attempt was made to identify correctly the county. Nevertheless, due to duplicate city names in several counties, there were instances where men were not included in the analysis. At any point where there appeared a discrepancy among several muster rolls for the same company, names and numbers of men were cross-referenced to obtain the most accurate count. Sadly, there are numerous muster rolls in such poor shape that they are completely incomprehensible. An exhaustive search of the muster-roll collection reveals that approximately 83,870 men went off to fight in either the state militia or the Confederate army. Due to the illegibility of many muster rolls, there is no doubt that this number falls short of the actual number of men who fought from 1861 to 1865. In the maps that document the numbers and percentages of men who enlisted in

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