Henry M. Teller: Colorado's Grand Old Man

By Duane A. Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 12
COLORADO'S GRAND OLD MAN

Nearly sixty-seven years old and exhausted from the strenuous campaigning and pressures of 1896, Teller started his nineteenth year in the Senate in March 1897. His health showed signs of the trials and tribulations Henry had faced in the past decade. Yet he had decided to stand for his fourth full term. “Colorado's Grand Old Man, ” as the Montrose Press (September 29, 1898) hailed him, stood alone among the state's leaders.

Harriet and Henry had sold their Central City home to Gilpin County and moved to Denver. Their son Harrison packed up their belongings and cleaned out the old law office. The Tellers lived with their daughter most of the time when they were not in Washington. In the summer they often stayed with Harrison at the family farm in Grand Junction. Henry had purchased 230 acres, which his son operated.

Henry made another choice: he officially left the Republican Party. Because of the party's position on gold, he had become a silver Republican. His old allies John Jones, Fred Dubois, Frank Cannon, John Shafroth, and others joined him.

Teller's adamant silver stand and support of Bryan alienated many party leaders, some of whom took revenge by placing him on committees as a non-Republican. The party had not consulted him on patronage matters since 1893. Henry was bitter about what he considered the Republicans' betrayal of silver and other matters, plus his own treatment. The disgruntled senator clearly stated his view of the current Republican Party

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Henry M. Teller: Colorado's Grand Old Man
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Henry M. Teller - Colorado's Grand Old Man *
  • Contents *
  • Preface *
  • Prologue: 1896 *
  • Chapter 1 - Prairie Lawyer *
  • Chapter 2 - The Promised Land: Central City *
  • Chapter 3 - Mountain Lawyer *
  • Chapter 4 - Mining Man *
  • Photographic Essay: the Tellers and Central City *
  • Chapter 5 - Territorial Politician *
  • Chapter 6 - The Young Senator *
  • Chapter 7 - Secretary of the Interior *
  • Chapter 8 - “the Indian Question” *
  • Photographic Essay: Henry Teller's Era *
  • Chapter 9 - Back to the Senate *
  • Chapter 10 - The Silver Issue *
  • Chapter 11 - Year of the Jubilee *
  • Chapter 12 - Colorado's Grand Old Man *
  • Epilogue: “my Record is My Life” *
  • Bibliographical Essay *
  • Index *
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