Henry M. Teller: Colorado's Grand Old Man

By Duane A. Smith | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE: “MY RECORD IS MY LIFE”

Teller traveled home from the Senate with many honors and tributes from his colleagues. As he neared his seventy-ninth birthday he, along with other pioneers of Clear Creek and Gilpin Counties, went to Idaho Springs on May 7, 1909, to participate in the fifty-year celebration of the gold discovery and gold rush. In July he spoke at the Pioneers Annual Reunion and gave a “characteristic speech, full of thought and feeling.”

Teller had also gone to a pioneer reunion in 1908 at Elitch Gardens to celebrate the anniversary of the arrival of the Russell party, who found the gold that started the rush. Henry gave a “very neat five minute speech.” To a new generation, the fifty-niners were relics of a long vanished past. Airplanes, automobiles, electricity, movies, telephones, ragtime melodies had all come into existence since those exciting days.

The Tellers stayed with their daughter Emma in Denver. They were not in the best of health, although they suffered more from old age than from anything debilitating. Henry would no longer farm; nor did he return to a law practice. Willard had died in 1905, and Henry had been in Washington too long to sustain a successful law practice. He did maintain an office in the Boston block and rode a streetcar to his office every day, staying until noon. His mining properties produced little income. The Tellers had not found great mining wealth in Colorado like most of their contemporaries. They did live comfortably, however.

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Henry M. Teller: Colorado's Grand Old Man
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Henry M. Teller - Colorado's Grand Old Man *
  • Contents *
  • Preface *
  • Prologue: 1896 *
  • Chapter 1 - Prairie Lawyer *
  • Chapter 2 - The Promised Land: Central City *
  • Chapter 3 - Mountain Lawyer *
  • Chapter 4 - Mining Man *
  • Photographic Essay: the Tellers and Central City *
  • Chapter 5 - Territorial Politician *
  • Chapter 6 - The Young Senator *
  • Chapter 7 - Secretary of the Interior *
  • Chapter 8 - “the Indian Question” *
  • Photographic Essay: Henry Teller's Era *
  • Chapter 9 - Back to the Senate *
  • Chapter 10 - The Silver Issue *
  • Chapter 11 - Year of the Jubilee *
  • Chapter 12 - Colorado's Grand Old Man *
  • Epilogue: “my Record is My Life” *
  • Bibliographical Essay *
  • Index *
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