Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat: Cities in the Third Millennium

By Council On Tall Buildings And Urban Habitat | Go to book overview

URBAN SYSTEMS


The Role of Accessibility for the Success of City Centres

Rolf Monheim

World-wide discussions about the success of city centres are focused on their accessibility. Generally, it is understood first of all as the accessibility for driving and parking cars. There prevails the attitude that this demand should be met without any restrictions. Therefore, there is a trend to continuously increase the infrastructure for car traffic. Regularly reoccurring shortages are not understood as a sign of a wrong concept but, to the contrary, a directive to continue the expansion. The common sentence "no parking no business" is misleading because it diverts the attention from the fact that first of all the excellence of a place determines the decision where to drive to. If a city centre is run down, even abundant parking will be unable to revitalise it, as can be seen in the USA.

In Germany, in contrast, city centres were able to defend their prime role. This is due to the combination of various public and private measures. The city administration, on one hand, improved accessibility by public transport, because it realised that this was the only means to bring large numbers of visitors to a densely built up area; it also improved attractiveness by a good design of the public open spaces now free from car traffic. The landowners and retailers, on the other hand, made the best use of this chance by investing in a better business and improving city marketing. Nowadays, in Germany even new shopping complexes mainly choose integrated city centre locations!


1 THE ROLE OF ACCESSIBILITY

The discussion of the role of accessibility generally is focused on the access from outside to the city centre, including parking. It underestimates the role of "internal accessibility", i.e. the walk from the place of arrival to the various activity locations and then back to the place of departure (mostly a public transport stop or off-street car park) (Fig. 1). The main reason for this is the orientation towards the "one-stop-shopping" of a suburban mall and the neglecting of the fact that most city centre visitors, at least in Europe, go to several destinations within the centre and like walking to them.

The discussion of traffic infrastructure furthermore neglects the fact that it does not necessarily determine travel decisions as such but by the way that it is perceived. As a consequence, the marketing of accessibility is important. Unfortunately, for a long time complaints of retailers on poor car-accessibility have resulted in a negative perception among the citizens. However, surveys show that visitors rate accessibility much better than retailers believe.

-237-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat: Cities in the Third Millennium
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 760

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.