Indigenous American Women: Decolonization, Empowerment, Activism

By Devon Abbott Mihesuah | Go to book overview

4
Comments on Linda McCarriston's “Indian Girls”

While reading Linda McCarriston's poem “Indian Girls, ” I was struck by two things: one is the similarity between the theme of the poem and that of Ian Frazier's recent book, On the Rez (2001), and the other is that the poem clearly illustrates the reality that, despite good intentions, white authors who write about Natives often do more harm than good. 1

Frazier is an adventure writer whose writing ability is well known (most notably from his work in Outside magazine). In On the Rez, he considers one of the problems that plagues many tribes—alcoholism—and then proceeds to give readers the impression that everyone on the “evil” Pine Ridge Reservation is an alcoholic who contributes to the poverty, pollution, and violence that swirl across the bleak landscape.

Like Frazier, the talented poet McCarriston likes Indians and is concerned about them and particularly about the abuse Native women suffer at the hands of Native men. Unfortunately, like Frazier, she gives the wrong impression of tribal life. As uninformed readers might interpret the poem, Native females in the cold, dark north are perpetual victims of abusive men, and their only recourse is to wallow in misery. Just as Frazier does not tell us about the myriad sober Sioux who strive to make life better for their tribe and family, McCarriston does not mention the strong women (and men) who do not tolerate physical and verbal abuse from each other. Both authors dwell on the negative aspects of tribal culture, which only reinforces non- Natives' stereotypes of drunk, misogynist Native men and easy, barhoppin' “girls” who cannot come up with any better solution to their problems.

The most volatile debates today in the realm of Indigenous Studies surface over questions of authoritative voice, who benefits from writing about Natives, and whether or not fiction and nonfiction writings about Natives should contribute to nation building, empow

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Indigenous American Women: Decolonization, Empowerment, Activism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 246

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.