Singing the Past: Turkic and Medieval Heroic Poetry

By Karl Reichl | Go to book overview

APPENDIX ONE

The Text of Täwke-batïr
The following is an edition of the poem as recorded from the Kazakh singer Müslimbek Sarqïtbay-ulï (born 1946) in Kulja (Yining) in the Chinese province of Xinjiang on September 12, 1989. For help with the transcription of the poem I am grateful to Mr. Bek Soltan of the Xinjiang branch of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (Urumchi); I am also grateful to Mr. Žiger Žanabïl for going over the Kazakh text with me as well as to Ms. Aygül Kasimova for help with other Kazakh poems about Täwke-batïr. Apart from this text, there are three further variants and two related poems:
1. a) A poem comprising 183 lines, which was taken down from Könbay Äbdiržanov by Taliġa Bekqožina in Alma-Ata on March 5, 1953. It is found as text no. 15 (in typescript) in folder ( papka) no. 263 of the Manuscript Department of the Kazakh Academy of Sciences in Alma-Ata. I am grateful to the Manuscript Department for providing me with a photograph of this text.
1. b) Twenty four-line stanzas, corresponding to the dialogue portion of the poem (ll. 41—100 of the text below), edited in Almanov 1988, 2 : 56 —58, under the title Täwke men kelinšek (Täwke and the Young Woman).
1. c) One stanza of four lines (a variant corresponding to ll. 41— 44 of the text below) has been printed (with musical transcription and Russian translation) in Erzakovič et al. 1982, 157 (music), 231 (text and translation). According to the notes (248) this variant was taken down from Aqat Qudayberdiev by Taliġa Bekqožina in Alma-Ata in 1968.
2. A further aytïs with Täwke as one of the protagonists (lying in prison and engaged in dialogue with a young woman called Urqïya) is edited in Almanov 1988, 2:51—56.

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