Rebel Daughters: Women and the French Revolution

By Sara E. Melzer; Leslie W. Rabine | Go to book overview

CONTRIBUTORS

HARRIET APPLEWHITE, Professor of Political Science at Southern Connecticut State University, is the author of Political Alignment in the French National Assembly, 1789-1791 (forthcoming, Louisiana State University Press, 1992). She and Darline Levy are co-editors of a collection of documents, Women in Revolutionary Paris, 1789-95 (University of Illinois Press, 1979, 1980), and an anthology of essays, Women and Politics in the Age of the Democratic Revolution (University of Michigan Press, 1990). They are presently completing a book, Gender and Citizenship in Revolutionary Paris (forthcoming, Duke University Press, 1993).

DOMINIQUE DESANTI is a historian, novelist, and journalist residing in Paris. Her books include Flora Tristan: La Femme révoltée (Hachette, 1972) [translated as A Woman in Revolt: A Biography of Flora Tristan] (Crown, 1976), Flora Tristan: Oeuvres et Vie Melées (U.G.E., 1972), Les Socialistes de L'utopie (Payot, 1971), and numerous other fiction and nonfiction works. She is presently working on her memoirs.

MADELYN GUTWIRTH is author of Mme. de Stael, Novelist: The Emergence of the Artist as Woman (University of Illinois Press, 1978) and a further study, The Twilight of the Goddesses, Women and Representation in the French Revolutionary Era (Rutgers University Press, 1992). She is retired from Westchester University, where she was Professor of French and Women's Studies. A former ACLS and National Humanities Center Fellow, she remains an active participant in the MLA and the American Society for 18th Century Studies.

MARY JACOBUS is John Wendell Anderson Professor of English at Cornell University. She is the author of Reading Woman: Essays in Feminist Criticism (Columbia University Press, 1986), the editor of Women Writing and Writing about Women (Croom Helm, 1979), the author of two books on Wordsworth- Tradition and Experiment in Wordsworth's Lyrical Ballads, 1798 (Clarendon, 1976) and Romanticism, Writing, and Sexual Difference: Essays on the Prelude (Clarendon, 1989)-and co-editor of Body/Politics: Women and the Discourses of Science (Routledge, 1990). She is currently working on a book about psychoanalysis, feminism, and the maternal body.

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