Screenwriting with a Conscience: Ethics for Screenwriters

By Marilyn Beker | Go to book overview

Screenwriting
With a Conscience

Ethics for Screenwriters

Marilyn Beker
Loyola Marymount University

LAWRENCE ERLBAUM ASSOCIATES, PUBLISHERS Mahwah, New Jersey London

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Screenwriting with a Conscience: Ethics for Screenwriters
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Lea's Communication Series *
  • Screenwriting with a Conscience - Ethics for Screenwriters *
  • Contents *
  • Preface *
  • Why Ethics? Why Me? Why Now? xv
  • Introduction *
  • Thinking Before Writing 3
  • Part I - Why?? *
  • Ethics? for Screenwriters???? 15
  • Message and Meaning 18
  • The Certainty of Why 25
  • Social Responsibility 44
  • What's Art Got to Do with It? 47
  • Part II - The Certainty of What: Anything Goes? *
  • A Glimpse of Stocking 55
  • Something Shocking 69
  • Where Have All the Elders Gone? 76
  • Conscience 86
  • Part III - What Really Matters *
  • What's It Worth? 91
  • The Good, the Bad, the Blurry 101
  • Nothing Left to Chance 107
  • Part IV - White Hats, Black Hats *
  • White Hats, Black Hats 125
  • Good 131
  • Bad 142
  • The Vilianero 149
  • Practical Writing Techniques 153
  • Angelic Acts, Dastardly Deeds 162
  • Crime and Punishment 168
  • Special Circumstances 172
  • Part V - Killing the Messenger *
  • No Sermons 183
  • Words of Wisdom 190
  • Part VI - Having Written and Writing More *
  • What's the Idea? 205
  • All's Fair in Love, War, and Showbiz? 214
  • Courage 226
  • Conclusion *
  • An Ethics Check List 231
  • Only the Beginning 233
  • Acknowledgments 234
  • References *
  • Index *
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