CHAPTER EIGHT

1901—1902: The Toast of Boston

Y ENTERING the Boston baseball market in 1901, the new American League was — in the accepted metaphor of the day — declaring war on the Boston Beaneaters. During the previous quarter century the National League team had garnered an unrivaled eight pennants and earned the enthusiastic support of Boston's fans. In light of such intensity of feeling among partisans, many suspected that a transfer of fan loyalty to the new franchise was unlikely and predicted that the new American League entry would be laughed out of town. Ban Johnson could not let that happen, of course, and that is why he paid so much attention to his Boston commitment, developing with Charles Somers, the chief owner of the new team, a strategic plan to penetrate the local baseball market. The first step was to build a new ballpark. Snow was still on the groundwhen construction began at the end of a trolley line on Huntington Avenue. With seating for over 9,000 fans and an expansive outfield (530 feet in center field), the Huntington Avenue Grounds would be Boston's best ballpark. Another marketing step involved underpricing the competition—specifically, offering bleacher seats for a quarter when the Beaneaters sold no seats for less than half a dollar. A third step aimed at providing new conveniences for the paying customer, the most discussed of which was the introduction of an announcer with a megaphone who informed the fans about batteries and personnel changes. Still, in the last analysis a business can't succeed if it doesn't provide a quality product. And so the fourth and most important element in the new club's marketing plan was to use Somers's money to purchase a strong and popular team.

The easiest way to achieve that goal was to fish for stars who had played in 1900 for the Boston National League squad. Each catch would

-103-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cy Young: A Baseball Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 283

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.