Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 3

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview
Save to active project

returned to Geneva in 1745. The uncle had executed a set of the reformers in smaller brass, and begun large medals of some of our great men then living; the nephew did several more, which were sold in copper at seven shillings and sixpence 1 each, and are very good performances, though inferior to the medals of the popes by Hamerani, 2 and more inferior to those of St. Urbain, 3 medallist to the last Dukes of Lorrain. There is a beautiful and numerous suite of Roman history in small medals of bronze by the younger Dassier.


J. CHRISTOPHER TANNER,

of Saxe-Gotha, came to England about 1733, and had practised carving and graving for snuff-boxes, gun-locks, and in mother-of-pearl. He was retained as a domestic in the family of the Prince of Wales, and by Mr. Conduit employed in the Mint, where he rose to be principal engraver on the death of Mr. Croker. He did medals of the Prince and Princess of Orange and Sir Isaac Newton, and the large family medal of the late king and queen and all their children.


LAURENCE NATTER,

(1705-1763,) 4

of Biberach in Suabia, was a good engraver of intaglias, and medallist. He struck a fine medal of Sir Robert Walpole, the reverse of which was copied from Lord Leicester's statue of Cicero. He had studied in Italy, and afterwards resided several years in England. In 1746 he went to Holland, to make a medal of the Prince of Orange, as in 1743 he had been in Denmark with Marcus Touscher,

____________________
1
At Dr. Mead's sale in 1755, ten medals in copper of eminent persons were sold for two guineas, and the set of Kings, thirty-six in number, produced only 4l. 4s. The resemblance was imaginary.—D.
2
[John Hamerani, medallist to popes Alexander VIII. Innocent XII. and Clement XI. died at Rome in 1705. There were several medallists of this name and family. See Sammlung berühmter Medailleurs und Münzmeister nebst ihren zeichen, Nürnberg, 1778; Goethe, Winkelmann und sein Jahrhundert; and Nagler's Künstler Lexícon.—W.]
3
[Ferdinand St. Urbain was long the assistant of John Hamerani, at Rome ; he died at Nancy, in 1738, aged eighty-four. Füssli, Künstler Lexicon.—W.]
4
[Goethe, Winkelmann und sein Jahrhundert.—W.]

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 354

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?