Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 3

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview

ADDENDA.

THE following notices relating to various artists have occurred since the former publication of these volumes ; but not being considerable enough to furnish separate articles, are here added for the information of those who would form a more complete catalogue, or continue these volumes.

Alan de Walsingham was one of the architects of the cathedral of Ely. V. Bentham's Hist. of Ely, p. 283.

John Helpstone, a mason, built the new tower at Chester, in 1322.

John Druel and Roger Keyes were employed as surveyors and architects by Archbishop Chichele. V. Life of that Prelate, p. 171.

Robert Smith, a martyr, was a painter for his amusement. Life of Sir Thomas Smith, p. 66.

Sir Thomas Smith built Hill-hall, in Essex. Richard Kirby was the archi- tect, ib. p. 228.

Sir Thomas Tressam is mentioned by Fuller in his Worthies of Northamp- tonshire, as a great builder and architect, p. 300.

Francis Potter, fellow of Trinity-college, Oxford, painted a picture of Sir Th. Pope. V. Warton's Life of Sir Th. 2d edit. p. 164.

In the hall of Trinity-college, Oxford, is a picture of J. Hayward, by Francis Potter, ib. p. 161 ; where it is also said that one Butler painted at Hatfield, p. 78. A glass-painter and his prices mentioned, ib,

Correlius de Zoom drew the portrait of Sir W. Cordall, in St. John's-college, ib. p. 227.

James Nicholson, a glass painter, ib. p, 16.

Dr. Monkhouse, of Queen's-college, Oxford, has a small picture on board, inches by 3½, containing two half-length portraits, neatly executed. The one has a pallet in his hand, the other a lute ; the date 1554, and over their heads the two following inscriptions :—

"Talis erat facie Gerlachus Fliccius, ipsâ
Loudoniâ quando Pictor in urbe fuit.
Hanc is ex speculo pro caris pinxit amicis,
Post obitum possint quo meminisse sui."

"Strangwish thus strangely depicted is ;
One prisoner for thother has done this.
Gerlin hath garnisht for his delight
This woorck whiche you se before your sight."

It is conjectured that these persons were prisoners on account of religion in the reign of Queen Mary.

Some English painters, of whom I find no other account, are mentioned in the Academy of Armoury, by Randle Holme, printed at Chester, in fol. 1688. "Mr. Richard Blackborne, a poet, for a fleshy face; Mr. Bloomer, for country swains and clowns ; Mr. Calthorpe, painter from life; Mr. Smith for fruit ; Mr. Moore, for general painting ; Pooley for a face ; Servile for drapery ; Mr. W. Bumbury, Wilcock and Hodges from life ; Mr. Poines for draught and invention ; and Mr. Tho. Arundel for good draught and history." Vide book iii. chap. iii. p. 156.

In the collection of the Earls of Peterborough at Drayton was a portrait of the first Earl of Sandwich, by Mrs. Creed, and a view of the house by Carter.

I have a poem printed on two sides of half a folio sheet of vellum, by

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