Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 3

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview

English heads, and may be increased hereafter by curious persons, who will be assisted by this sketch 1 to compile a more extensive and complete history of the art in England.


REGINALD ELSTRACKE, 2

(1610,)

whose works are more scarce than valuable, flourished under Elizabeth and her successor, in whose reign he probably died. His first print, according to the date, is the portrait of Sir Philip Sidney, done probably soon after his death.

Queen Elizabeth, done after her death.

The Black Prince, in an oval, as are most of the following :—

Richard Whittington, Lord Mayor, and his cat, [so altered, originally with a scull, 6l.—S.]

Gervase Babington, Bishop of Wor- cester, æt. suæ 59, with four Latin verses, and this motto, Virtus Dei in infirmitate. [1615.] Sir Julius Cæsar, Knight, Master of the Rolls. [4to. 10l. 15s.—S.]

Henry V. ; titles in Latin.

Sir Thomas More ; over his head Disce mori mundo, vivere disce Deo; [with the seals.]

Thomas Sutton, founder of the Char- ter-house ; done after his death, 1611, which shows that Elstracke was then living. [ob. 1611. æt. 79, sm. 4to.]

Edmund, Lord Sheffield, President of the North. [Earl of Mulgrave, 10l. 15s.—S.]

Thomas Howard, Earl of Suffolk, Losd Treasurer of England.

Robert, Earl of Essex, [when young; oval.]

Anne Boleyn. [In a rich habit. 7l. 15s.—S.]

John Harrington, Baron of Exton. [The younger, ob. 1614, æt. 22, oval, between a lion and a cock.]

William Perkins.

Lord Darnley and Queen Mary, (w.l.) on one plate. [" The most excellent Princesse M. Q. Scotlande, mother to our Souvereigne Lorde K. James I. and the most illustrious Prince Henry, Lorde Darnley, Kinge of Scotland," (w.l.) standing near each other, with the arms of France and Scotland between them. The king is represented in a hat and feather, holding a truncheon ; the queen with a large veil and laced kerchief in her hand. This print was sold for the enormous price of 81l. 18s.—S.; and purchased for the late Duke of Buck- ingham.]

Padesha Shassallem, the great Mogul.

Philip III.

Christian IV.

____________________
1
It must be recollected that Walpole's catalogue, formed as he describes it to have been, was the first offered to the public which attributed the prints respectively to their several engravers. Neither the publications of Granger nor Bromley had then appeared ; and both of them had a different classification. But what will be considered as interesting in the present age, is the extraordinary, and apparently capricious value set upon single portraits, which, when first issued by their obscure and laborious artists, did not produce so many pence, comparatively speaking, as the pounds given for them within these few years. The Editor, therefore, notwithstanding Walpole's caution against giving too many specimens, will venture to extend his lists, with a certain elucidation, which he has been enabled to do by a very liberal communication of catalogues with the prices annexed. In this respect, the Editor feels particular obligation to J. P. Ord, Esq. of Edge-hill, Derby.—D.
2
He generally wrote his name Renold.—REYNOLD ELSTRAK.—D.

-135-

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