Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 3

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview
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Duke's picture at her breast, 1 at Long- leate. But the best portrait of her is in Wilson's Life of James I. The reader would find it well worth his while to turn to it. [P. 258, three- quarters, sitting at a table.]

Sir John Haywood, LL.D., died 1627 ; with emblems. W. Pass, f. [The epigrammatist.]

Robert, Earl of Essex, on horseback.

George, Duke of Buckingham, ditto. [George Villiers, Duke, Marquis, and Earl of Buckingham; horse richly ca- parisoned, ships at sea, 1625, sheet, 15l. 4s. 6d.—S.]

Christian IV. King of Denmark, and Frederick, Duke of Holstein, both standing, in one print.

Darcy Wentworth, æt. 32, 1624.

James I. crowned, and sitting with a sword in his right hand, on which, Fidei Defensor, a death's head on his left on his knee; before him Prince Henry, with his left hand on a skull on a table. W. Passæus, f. et sc. anno Domini 1621.

Another, with the same date, but the king's left hand is on the globe, not on a skull, and instead of Prince Henry there is Prince Charles. This fine print is in my possession. 2

Sir Henry Rich, captain of the Guards; oval frame. W. Pass, sc. [Afterwards Earl of Holland.]

ADDITIONAL PORTRAITS.

James I. Anne of Denmark, Princes Henry and Charles, King and Queen of Bohemia, with their progeny, half- sheet, 30l. 9s.—S. Vox regis vox Dei.

Triumphus Jacobi Regis, 22l. 10s. —S.

James I. with hat and feather; the border is on a distinct plate.

Henry, Earl of Holland, 32l. 11s.— S. In armour.

Henry Vere, Earl of Oxford, in a large hat and feather. J. Payne, many figures by W. Pass, 30l. 9s.—S.

George Chapman, poet.

James I. with P. Henry, (w. l.) half sheet.


MAGDALEN PASS. 3

I find little of her work but a very scarce little head in my own collection, representing the Lady Katherine, at that time Marchioness, afterwards Duchess, of Buckingham, with a feather fan. It is slightly finished, but very free. Salmacis and Hermaphroditus, 1623; Cephalus and Procris, and Latona changing the Lycian peasants into frogs; both after Elsheimer. [Her own portrait, Alpheus and Arethusa, two landscapes after Rowland Savery.]


SIMON PASS 4

engraved counters of the English royal family, as I have already mentioned in the life of Hilliard. Vertue says, he

____________________
1
This was a fashion at that time. There are three or four ladies drawn so by Cornelius Jansen, at Sherburn-castle, the Lord Digby's ; of which Elizabeth, Countess of Southampton, a half-length richly attired, is one of Jansen's best works. The ruins of the Bishop's castle Sir Walter Raleigh's grove, the house built by him and the first Earl of Bristol, the siege the castle sustained in the civil war, a grove planted by Mr. Pope, and the noble lake made by the last lord, concur to make that seat one of the most venerable and beautiful in England.
2
[Sold for 13l. 2s. 6d. at the Strawberry-hill sale.—S.]
3
[Born at Utrecht in 1583. Immerzeel.—W.]
4
[Born at Utrecht in 1591. Immerzeel.—W.]

-144-

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