Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 3

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview

ADDITIONAL PORTRAITS.

Sir Thomas Smith of Bedborough, Kent, Ambassador to Russia; fur robe, 1617.

Lodowick Stuart, Duke of Rich- mond.

Sir Henry Rich, general.

Sir Francis Bacon, 9l. 2s. 6d.—S.

Prince Henry, 1602, 8vo.

Richard Martin, Oraculum Londi- nense et Poeta, ob. æt. 48, 1618. 43l. 1s.—S. Another is in the Ash- molean Museum, Oxford.

George Chapman, poet.

Aaron Rathbone, a delineator of maps.

T. Scott, æt. 45.

Paul Van Somer, Pictor.

Robert Car, Earl of Somerset, oval, 4to.

Edward Cecil, Viscount Wimbledon.

Edward Somerset, Earl of Worcester, 1618.

Sir Robert Naunton, Ambassador, in a rich dress, holding a letter addressed Au Roy de la Grande Bretagne, em- blems ; with a motto and coat of arms, 4to. 35l. 14s. 6d.


JOHN PAYNE

was scholar of Simon Pass, and the first Englishman that distinguished himself by the graver. 1 Had his application been equal to his genius, there is no doubt but he would have shone among the first of his profession; but he was idle : and though recommended to King Charles, neglected his fortune and fame, and died in indigence before he was

____________________
for the embellishment of books, which was then growing into general practice, which he perfected at Paris. He likewise engraved them, and afterwards attempted portraits with great success, and illustrated Homer, Virgil, and Ovid; editions which are scarce and highly valued on the continent. Walpole's conjecture as to Crispin's having been at first employed by the English printsellers, during his residence abroad, may be correct; but his residence in England, of which the term is unknown, is proved by circumstances. His work was entirely done with the graver, in a clear and very neat style ; certainly not without stiffness and a want of harmony in the distribution of his lights and shadows ; and not greater than the characteristic style of the painters who were his contemporaries. The engravings very closely imitated the pictures, or the drawings. He drew the human figure with as much correctness as any of his immediate predecessors in the art ; and with a degree of exactness not usually found in their smaller works. Many of his portraits were first drawn by him from the life.

Of his three sons and his daughter, all inherited his talent, and improved it from following his instructions and practice. CRISPIN, the eldest, was of inferior skill, as appears from the prints which are decidedly by him : and it is very probable, that where an evident difference is observable in some of the father's engravings, such are by the son; the same name having misled the collectors.

WILLIAM PASSE approached nearly to his father's excellence. His industry is proved by the catalogue of his works, and their merit or curiosity by the prices above stated to have been given for them.

Of SIMON, the youngest brother, the same may be observed. These were all of one school, the manner and principles of which were adopted by each of them.

Of the sister, MAGDALENE PASSE, two portraits only are known. The classical subjects which she engraved are inserted in her father's edition of Ovid's Metamorphoses; and are finished with considerable delicacy.

The plates were placed in the hands of the venders, who rolled them off, and who having marked them with an excudit, and their own names and residence, entirely omitted the necessary notice of the artist in some of the most valuable specimens.—D.

1
He was preceded by W. Rogers.—D.

-147-

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