Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 3

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview
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A. BLOOM,

a name to a print of James I. which is inscribed in Italian, Giacomo Re della Gran Bretagna. The same person, I suppose, is meant by his initials, A. B., which I find to some prints of that age.


THOMAS COCKSON

is unknown to us but by his works here following—

Mathias I. emperor.

Demetrius, emperor of Russia.

Mary de' Medici.

Lewis XIII.

Concini, Marquis d'Ancre. 1617.

Francis White, Dean of Carlisle, [Bishop of Ely.] 1624. These six are in folio.

Henry Bourbon, Prince of Condé.

Princess Elizabeth.

Samuel Daniel, 1609.

T. Coryat.

The Revels of Christiandom.

King James I. sitting in Parliament.

King Charles I. in like manner. Each on a whole sheet.

Charles, Earl of Nottingham, on horseback. Sea and ships.

[George Clifford, Earl of Cumber- land, equestrian, 11l. 11s.—S.]

Cockson generally used this mark


PETER STENT

was, I believe, an engraver, certainly a printseller. On a portrait of the King of Bohemia is said—Sold by Peter Stent. To one of the above-mentioned Francis White, but engraved by G. Mountain, is, P. Stent excud., as is to a cut of Sir James Campbell, Lord Mayor in 1629 ; but to one of Andrew Willet, with six Latin verses, are the letters P. S., who probably cut the plate, as no other artist is mentioned. Stent certainly lived so late as 1662 ; for in that year, as he had done in -650, he published a list of the prints that he vended, which list was reprinted by Overton (who bought his stock) in 1672. In the first catalogue were mentioned plates of London, St. James's Nonsuch, Whitehall, Wansted, Oatlands, Hampton-court, Theobalds, Westminster, Windsor, Greenwich, Eltham, Richmond, Woodstock, Basing-house; Battle of Naseby, two sheets, with General Ludlow on horseback ; two more of the battle of Dunbar; all now extremely scarce, and the more valuable as many of the edifices themselves no longer exist. Nonsuch, that object of curiosity, is commonly known only by the imperfect and confused sketch in one of Speed's maps ; but there

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