Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 3

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview

REIGN OF CHARLES THE FIRST.

R. MEIGHAN,

(1628,)

certainly worked in the year 1628, as he then published a head of John Clavel, and lived in St. Dunstan's churchyard.—Ames, 46. 1


THOMAS CECILL,

(1631,)

commended by Mr. Evelyn, did a print of Sir John Burgh, who was killed at the isle of Rhee, 1627, [in armour with a truncheon, 9l.—S.] of John Weaver, 2 which is dated 1631, of Walter Curle, Bishop of Winchester, a small whole- length of Archee, the king's jester, an oval head of John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, Queen Elizabeth on horseback, Gustavus Adolphus, 3 [Sir J. Kidderminster, 1628, 4to.] Edw. Reynolds, 4 Bishop of Norwich, Sir W. Cecil, and the frontispiece to Lord Bacon's Sylva Sylvarum. [Sir William Cornwallis.]


ROBERT VAUGHAN.

His works, though not numerous nor good, are more common than those of the ten preceding. Such are—

James I.

Lancelot Andrews, Bishop of Win- chester.

Sir John Wynn, of Gwedyr, in Car- narvonshire, knight and baronet, obiit 1626, æt. 73 ; a very large head coarsely done. [10l. 10s.—S.]

George Clifford, Earl of Cumberland,

____________________
1
I am told, since the former edition, that Meighan was not an engraver, but a bookseller and editor ; that he published an edition of Shakspeare's Merry Wives of Windsor in 1630, and that his name often occurs on the records of the Stationers' Company.
2
It is prefixed to his Funeral Monuments: the frontispiece is by the same hand.
3
In Scudery's Curia Politiœ.
4
This head of Bishop Reynolds was probably engraven while he was only rector of Braunton, in Northamptonshire, of which he was possessed in 1631; see the title to his Treatise of the Passions. He was not consecrated bishop till 1660, and one of Cecill's works bears date after the reign of Charles I.

-155-

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