Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 3

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview
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F. H. VAN HOVEN,

another Dutch engraver, and more prolific, 1 seems to have worked here from the end of Charles I. to near the conclusion of the reign of King William: his cuts are dated in the years 1648, 1653, 1654, 1692, &c.; 2 but I have seen nothing of his hand that makes a particular enumeration of his works necessary. [Charles II. and his queen, Catherine of Braganza, joining hands, oblong sheet. James, Duke of Monmouth, and Anne, his duchess, ovals. Sir Matthew Hale, Chief Justice. Sir Thomas Browne. Dr. Featley.]


ROTERMANS 3

did a print of Sir William Waller, dated 1643, [19l. 19s.—S.] but I do not know that he was in England, having found nothing more of his hand, —unless a print of Nathaniel Richards, gent. mentioned by Ames, p. 141, 4 with the initial letters T. R., be his. Rawlins the medallist seldom put more than those capitals either to his coins or writings. They may therefore belong to him.


FRANCIS BARLOW,

who has already appeared in this work, 5 is peculiarly entitled to a place here ; though, having given what particulars Vertue could discover relative to his life, I shall here only specify his etchings.

For Edward Benlow's Divine Poems, called Theophila,

____________________
1
Ames mentions two dozen of his prints.
2
There is a small print of King William on horseback, by Van Hove, prefixed to the Epitome of the Art of War, 1692. He did a considerable number of prints for John Dunton, the bookseller, in that king's reign. See Dunton's Life and Errors, p. 346.
3
He spelled his name Rodttermondt.

[Roddermondt was an artist of great merit ; he was a contemporary of Rembrandt, and some accounts state that he was instructed by him. Nagler gives a description of seven etchings by him, besides the portrait of Sir William Waller. The British Museum, however, contains other undescribed etchings by his hand; they are all very rare.—W. S.]

4
See vol. i. p. 370.
5
The last horse-race run before Charles II. near Datchett-ferry, near Windsor- castle, 24th Aug. 1684, drawn from the place, and designed by Francis Barlow, 1687. An oblong sheet etching. Bindley's Catalogue, 7l. 7s.—D.

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