Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 3

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview

Alexander Brome, 1664, æt. 44.

Dr. John Wallis. [The mathemati- cian.]

John Pearson, Bishop of Chester, from the life.

John Cockshut. [Nobilis Anglus.]

The seven Bishops, copied from White's plate for Loggan by Vander- bank, who worked for him towards the end of his life. [5l. 7s. 6d. —S.]

James, Duke of Ormond, in an oval.

James, Duke of Monmouth [and Buccleugh,] young, in the robes of the garter, [in an oval of oak leaves.] The handsomest print of him. [21l. 10s. -S.]

James, Earl of Derby. [Large 4to.]

Thomas Sanders. Flesshire pinx.

Dr. Richard Allestry, from the life.

Peter Gunning, Bishop of Ely. [2l. 6s.]

Edward Waterhouse.

Mr. Joshua Moone.

Dr. Henry More.

George Walker of Londonderry.

Leonard Plukenet, 1690.

Archbishop Sancroft, from the life.

William Loyd, Bishop of St. Asaph.

Queen Henrietta Maria.

Frontispiece to a Common-prayer- book in folio, 1687, designed by John Bapt. Gaspars.

Titus Oates.

Sir George Wharton, but no name, æt. 46.

Another, 1657.

George, Prince of Denmark, from the life.

Pope Innocent XI.

An emblematic print of Cromwell at length in armour. A. M. Esq. fe.

The Academy of Pleasure, 1665. Head of a man with a high-crowned hat.

Frontispiece to Rea's Florist, some- thing in the manner of Cornel. Galle.

Frontispiece to Guidott's Thermœ Britannicœ.

ADDITIONAL PORTRAITS.

Anne, Duchess of Monmouth.

Gilbert Sheldon, Archbishop of Can- terbury, ad vivum, 13l. 2s. 6d.—S.

Dr. Isaac Barrow, 12l.—S.

James Sharp, Archbishop of St. Andrews, 14l.—Bindley.

Col. Giles Strangeways, in armour, 6l. 10s.—Bindley.

Henry Hibbert; Arthur Jackson ; James Janeway—Portraits to books.

George, Earl of Berkeley, in his robes, 1679. 12l.—S.

John Dolben, Bishop of Rochester, John Fell, Bishop of Oxford, and Dr. R. Allestry, called Chipley, Chopley, and Chepley. Lely pinx. 27l. 16s. 6d.—S. [It is marked only D. Loggan, excudit, and is a mezzotint.]

William Holder. Arthur Jackson.

Thomas Saunders de Ireton, a curi- ous unfinished proof, 6l. 8s.—S.

Edward Benlowes, in a sheet con- taining a view of London and Old St. Paul's.

John Playford, musician, Richard Haydock, John Sparrow, "Amator Jacobi Behmen."

Archbishop Laud.

Loggan brought over with him Blooteling and Valcke, whom I am going to mention. Vanderbank worked for him, and one Peter Williamson, [see post, vol. iii. p. 234,] of whom I find no account, but that Vertue thought the emblematic print of Cromwell in the above list might be done by him.


ABRAHAM BLOOTELING 1

came from Holland in 1672 or 73, when the French invaded it, but stayed not long, nor graved much here, but did some plates and some mezzotintos that were admired.

____________________
1
[Born at Amsterdam, 1634, according to Huber and others ; the year of his

-219-

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