Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 3

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview

Duchess of Portsmouth, sitting.

St. Cecilia playing on a base-viol, with boy-angels flying ; probably done at Paris, after Vandyck.

Mary, Princess of Orange, 1678.

William, Prince of Orange, both after Lely.

General Moncke.

Stephen Monteage, 1675.

Charles II. sitting; the face ex- punged afterwards, and replaced with King William's.

A merry Andrew, after Francis Halls, graved in an odd manner. [In- scribed Edward Le Davis, Londini, sculpsit.]

An Ecce Homo, after Caracci, scarce.

Charles, Duke of Richmond, a boy, after Wissing, 1672.


[WILLIAM] LIGHTFOOT,

(—1671,)

says Mr. Evelyn, 1 "hath a very curious graver, and special talent for the neatness of his stroke, little inferior to Wierinx; and has published two or three Madonnas with much applause." I suppose he is the same person with William Lightfoot, a painter, mentioned in the third volume of this work, p. 26. 2 [He excelled in painting landscapes and perspective views, and as an architect was employed under Wren in building the Royal Exchange.]


MICHAEL BURGHERS

came to England soon after Louis XIV. took Utrecht, and settled at Oxford, where, besides several other things, he engraved the almanacs : his first appeared in 1676, without his name. 3 He made many small views of the new buildings at Queen's [and Christ-church colleges,] and drew an exact plan of the old chapel [of Queen's] before it was pulled down. His other works were—

Sir Thomas Bodley ; at the corners, heads of W. Earl of Pembroke, Arch- bishop Laud, Sir Kenelm Digby, and John Selden. [For the Catalogue.]

William Somner, the antiquary.

Franciscus Junius, from Vandyck.

A medal and reverse of William, Earl of Pembroke, (who lived) in 1572.

John Barefoot, letter-doctor to the University, 1681. [5l. 12s. 6d.—Bindley.]

Head of James II. in an almanac, 1686.

Small head of T. V. Sir Thomas Wyat.

Anthony Wood, in a niche.

King Alfred, from a MS. in the Bodleian Library.

____________________
1
Sculptura, p. 99.
2
Vol. ii. p. 91, of this Edition.
3
The first Oxford Almanac was drawn up by Maurice Wheeler, M.A. for the year 1673, 8vo. Robert White engraved the sheet Almanac in 1674, with several mythological figures. They have been continued from 1676 to the present time. The prints in the first forty-seven were engraved, for the greater part, by M. Burghers. Oxoniana.—D.

-222-

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