Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 3

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview

Vanderbank engraved a set of heads for Kennet's History of England; they were designed by Lutterel. Vanderbank executed from the Conqueror to Queen Elizabeth ; the rest were finished by M. Vandergutch.

He also graved after Verrio's paintings at Windsor, and some other histories, and did some plates which have his name in Tijon's Book of Iron-works. He appears too to have had some concern in a manufacture of tapestry; in the Duke of Ancaster's sale was a suite of tapestry with Vanderbank's name to it.


NICHOLAS YEATES 1 AND JOHN COLLINS,

(1680,)

two obscure engravers, whom Vertue mentions together for these plates—

Sir William Waller, ob. 1669.

Embassadors from Bantam, H. Peart, pictor. ; printed 1682, large folio.

Leonard Plunkenet, M.D. Collin sculp. 1681.

Oliver Plunkenet, Archbishop, ob. 1681. Collins Bruxell. sculp. [Robert Dixon, Prebendary of Rochester.]

I find the name of R. Collins, jun. to a print, done by him from the life, of Francis Peck, the antiquary,. born 1692. V. Ames, p. 135.


WILLIAM CLARKE

did a head of George, Duke of Albemarle, from a painting of Barlow ; and another of John Shower, from a picture of his own ; the latter is a small mezzotinto.

[Elizabeth, Duchess of Somerset, oval.]


JOHN CLARKE

(1690,)

was an engraver at Edinburgh, where he did two profile heads in medal of William and Mary, Prince and Princess of Orange, yet dated 1690 ; and prints of Sir Matthew Hale, of George Baron de Goertz (this was in concert with Pine), of Dr. Humphrey Prideaux, and a plate with seven little heads of Charles II. and his queen, Prince Rupert,

____________________
no account of his second son, his name was probably Peter, and he might be an engraver.
1
There is a portrait of George Mountaigne, Bishop of London, by George Yeates, which was sold for 4l. Bindley.—D.

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 354

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.