Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 3

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview

times by Lemens; and he was so expeditious as to finish a half-length plate in a summer's day—sufficient reason for me not to specify all his works. Before he arrived here, he had performed a print of Charles, Duke of Bavaria, and his Secretary in 1670. His mark was thus

1. Another print was of a Countess of Meath after Mignard ; and a third, of the Duke of Florence and his Secretary. Towards the end of his time the art was sunk very low ; Vertue says that about the year 1690, Verrio, Cooke and Laguerre, could find no better persons to engrave their designs than S. Gribelin and Paul Vansomer— he might in justice have added that the engravers were good enough for the painters; and in 1702 that J. Smith was forced to execute in mezzotinto the frontispiece to Signor Nicolò Cosimo's book of music. But before we come to that period we have one or two more to mention, and one a good artist:


ROBERT WHITE,

(1645-1704,)

was born in London 1465, and had a natural inclination to drawing and etching, which he attempted before he had any instructions from Loggan, of whom he learned, and for

____________________
1
As Vertue sometimes calls him Paul, and sometimes John Vansomer, I conclude they were different persons, and that this mark belonged to the latter.—

Sir Bevil Shelton in armour, Mathias Van Sommeren ad vivum sculpsit, 1678, 5l. S.—D.

-227-

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