Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 3

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview
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April 1, 1719. Sir Nicholas presented to King George I. two complete sets of the cartoons, and a set each to the prince and princess. The king gave him a purse of 100 guineas, and the prince a gold medal. The Duke of Devonshire, of whom he had borrowed 400l., remitted to him the interest of four years ; and in the following year procured him to be knighted by the king. He painted some portraits here, not with much success in likeness, and his eyes beginning to fail, he retired to France in 1724. His collection of drawings had been sold before, in 1723. Among them were some after Dominichino and Guercino, and one after Daniel de Volterra, 1 which Vertue preferred to all his works. There were an hundred and four heads, 2 hands, and feet, traced off from the cartoons. While he was making drawings of the cartoons, a person in London offered him 200l. for them, but he would not conclude any agreement till the plates were finished. They were sold at his auction for 52 guineas. The total amount of his drawings came to 320l. His whole number of plates, large and small, was 153.


CHARLES DUPUIS,

besides part of the cartoons, engraved some plates of the story of Charles I.; but differing with Dorigny, and the climate not agreeing with him, he returned to Paris, where he died suddenly in 1743. A younger brother of his came over, and did some plates, but returned soon, finding greater encouragement at home.

____________________
noblest print in the world. It is unquestionably a noble work, but Dorigny seems to have exhausted his genius upon it. His cartoons are very poor. He engraved them in his old age, and was obliged to employ assistants, who did not answer his expectation."—Essay on Prints, p. 83.—D.
1
[The Descent from the Cross, recently engraved in a first-rate style by the Cavaliere Toschi, of Parma.—W. S.]
2
These were sold in one lot for 74l.; separately, afterwards, for 102l.—[These heads have been engraved, and were published by John Boydell, under the following title—"The School of Raphael, or the Student's Guide to Expression in Historical Painting; illustrated by Examples engraved by Duchange and others; under the inspection of Sir Nicholas Dorigny, from his own Drawings, after the most celebrated Heads in the Cartoons at the King's Palace," &c. 4to. London.—W.]

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