Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 3

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview

REIGNS OF GEORGE THE FIRST AND SECOND.

HENRY HULSBERG,

born at Amsterdam, did prints of Sir Bulstrode Whit- locke, Robert Warren, A.M., and Joseph Warder, a physician; some of the plates in the Vitruvius Britannicus; a large view of St. Peter's-church at Rome, &c. and a head of Aaron Hill, for his History of the Ottoman Empire, fol. 1711. After a paralytic illness of two years he died in 1729, and was buried in the Lutheran church of the Savoy, of which he had been warden, and by which community and by a Dutch club he had been supported, after he became incapable of business.


JOHN FABER,

born in Holland, drew many pictures from the life on vellum 1 with a pen, and scraped several mezzotintos, both from paintings and from nature. His most considerable works, and those not excellent, were portraits of the founders of colleges at Oxford and Cambridge. He died at Bristol in May 1721. His son,


JOHN FABER, JUNIOR,

surpassed his father by far, and was the next mezzotinter in merit to Smith. He was born in Holland, but brought to England at three years old. His first instructions he received from his father ; afterwards he studied in Vanderbank's academy. He executed a prodigious number of portraits, some of which are bold, free, and beautiful. 2 To

____________________
1
Vertue had seen one of these small heads, inscribed, J. Faber delin. in Graven age, 1692.
2
Works of J. Faber, 165 plates, 2 vols. fol. from which, as of great merit, Bryan has selected—

The Beauties at Hampton-court.

The Kit-cat portraits.

The Converted Chinese.

Sir Isaac Newton.

Michael Rysbrach, sculptor.

Enoch Zeeman and George Lambert, painters.

Charles II. sitting in his robes of state.

The taking of Namur, after Wyck.—D.

-255-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 354

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.